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Damping Constant

  1. Jan 24, 2017 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    I am solving for the damping constant (b). The amplitude has decreased to 80% of its original height (0.1m) after 10 oscillations. The mass is 2 kg, k is 5000 N/m, w is 50 rads/s, T = pi/25 s.

    2. Relevant equations
    x = 0.1cos(50t)
    v = -5sin(50t)
    a = -250cos(50t)

    3. The attempt at a solution
    I am not sure what equation to use, I tried
    w = ((k/m)-(b^2/4(m)^2))^1/2
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 24, 2017 #2

    BvU

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    Helo Tyler, :welcome:

    With those equations you'll never be able to solve for the damping constant -- it doesn't appear !
    Where do you think it should be sitting ?
     
  4. Jan 24, 2017 #3
    I'm not sure, the answer in the back of the book is 0.71 kg/s. I think that I might need to use a different formula, but I'm not sure.
     
  5. Jan 24, 2017 #4

    BvU

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    What I meant is that your relevant equations feature a constant amplitude: no damping.
     
  6. Jan 24, 2017 #5
    Those are the equations assuming no damping. Maybe they aren't relative...
     
  7. Jan 24, 2017 #6

    BvU

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    So you can not use ##x = 0.1\cos(50t)## . The link I gave you should help you further...
     
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