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Dehumidifying a Room

  1. Mar 14, 2005 #1
    There was a physics problem I saw the other day which asked how to dehumidify a medium/large room in one minute. I have absolutely no idea how to figure this out, so I was wondering if any of you know how.
    - chris

    P.S. If it's impossible to dehumidify in one minute, then I must have read incorrectly, and it's probably 10 minutes.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 15, 2005 #2

    tony873004

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    If you could lower the room's temperature to below freezing, that might work. The colder you make it, the quicker it'll happen. You could also use a large air pump and suck out all the air. No air = no humidity.

    By dehumidify, do they mean make sure there's absolutely no water vapor in the air?

    I imagine this is a hypothetical question with a clever but impractical answer, as the values you would need to actually compute this are missing. (ie. room size, temperature, initial humidity level, etc.)
     
  4. Mar 15, 2005 #3

    ShawnD

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    You can also try blowing large amounts of pulverized sodium hydroxide or calcium oxide into the room. Both are excellent desiccants.
     
  5. Mar 15, 2005 #4
    Yes it is a hypothetical question and there has to be absolutely no humidity in the air. Both of your answers seem clever, but how is it possible to freeze a room in one minute?
    - chris
     
  6. Mar 15, 2005 #5

    tony873004

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    With my hypothetical instant room freezer lazer gun!

    You could also get a large dump truck and fill the room with dry sand. No air, no humidity.

    Or fill the room with water. Or would that be considered 100% humidity?

    Or fill the room with a liquid other than water.

    Do let us know what the answer is :smile:
     
  7. Mar 15, 2005 #6

    ShawnD

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    Maybe it's a play on words. If you blow up the entire building, technically it's no longer a room so you can't say the "room" has any humidity in it.
     
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