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Difference Engineering Physics, Applied Physics, traditional engineer

  1. May 16, 2014 #1
    Hi, what is the difference between engineering physics, applied physics, traditional engineering(mech E, elec E)?
    Thanks!
     
  2. jcsd
  3. May 16, 2014 #2

    Simon Bridge

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    In what context?
    They are different names for jobs which may actually involve identical work, they are college degree courses that are defined by their course requirements.... and so on.

    Simplistically: Trad. Engineers build stuff, physicists work on the theory behind what engineers do, applied physics is the study of the physics of the World, and engineering physics is the part of applied physics that pertains to constructions - the bit of the World that people build.

    All have disciplines that can be applied more broadly.
     
  4. May 16, 2014 #3
    I guess I was wondering in terms of graduate school and what careers I can pursue after obtaining these degrees.
     
  5. May 16, 2014 #4

    Simon Bridge

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    Engineers usually make more money than physicists, but the rest depends on your school and the market where you live.
    For grad school - you need to see your prospectus.
     
  6. May 16, 2014 #5
    Well, at my school an engineering physics major would take all the courses that a physics major is required to take PLUS most of the courses that an ME or EE major has to take.

    Engineering physics is a perfect degree for those planning on going to grad school but still haven't decided whether they want to study physics or engineering.
     
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