Disillusioned math major

  • #101
Starting to feel a bit defeated myself. I have an interview with Revature and for a data software engineer position next week. I'm starting to lean more and more toward the Revature thing. It seems a bit more secure during these times, and I need something relatively soon. I'm pretty confident I will be accepted into the program, if I decide to pursue it. I can see full stack dev training going a long way. Juggling job hunting with self training doesn't sound like a better alternative. I'd much rather be in a program following a curriculum making minimum wage for a short time with the high probability of a job afterward while maybe self training in a few things that interest me instead of possibly making minimum wage with no clear end in sight, job hunting and trying to focus on one of the myriad of things I could potentially teach myself that may or may not end up paying off.
I get you I been out of college two year now. I decided to do this corona virus data entry job instead of the warehouse thing. But that is my life some life the only jobs I have had are tutoring and temp data entry jobs.
I do not know I think we math and physics major messed up and should have chosen computer science. Next week I have to choose classes for a new major I am planning to do and it hurts my heart to give money to these college professor who treat you like you are worthless and often do not respond to emails.

From what I read about revarture though they will give you training but you still have to pass the coding interview of whoever want to hire you and you have to sign a 2 year contact.
The way I see if you can pass the coding interview then you do not even need the company.
 
  • #102
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They send you a pretty comprehensive series of online courses to go through and then a study guide to prepare for the "coding" interview. The interview is not really a coding interview. You don't write any code. They will just ask you conceptual questions about programming that you got from the courses. There will probably be some syntax related questions on SQL, C# and Java, which again is covered in the courses. The two year contract is really the only sacrifice you're making. Whether it's worth it or not is up to you. I have the coding interview in a few days. I'm still not sure if I will join if I pass the interview, but I want to know more, and studying for that interview will help me with any other coding related interview, so that in itself is worth the effort to me. I mainly want to get a solid grasp on what the course material will be in the program and what kind of job I can expect to get afterwards. If it's legit full stack development, I may go through with it, because I see that paying off big time and perhaps being worth it. Depending on the legitness of the program as a whole, you might be able to think of it as a two year training program. I mentioned before I got my last job through a training program, and it worked out pretty well, up until corona virus.

My previous job was basically data entry, but I was assigned to develop Python code to automate it. What do you do in data entry?
 
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  • #103
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Wait did you not get a GAship?

I entertain going back to school sometimes, but if I ever did, it wouldn't be for a job. I went to grad school specifically for a job, the job of GA LOL. You should have a GAship set up so you don't get into more debt. School should be fun, and it usually is fun. You shouldn't feel regret over going back. This could be a great opportunity for you. I wish you the best.
 
  • #104
They send you a pretty comprehensive series of online courses to go through and then a study guide to prepare for the "coding" interview. The interview is not really a coding interview. You don't write any code. They will just ask you conceptual questions about programming that you got from the courses. There will probably be some syntax related questions on SQL, C# and Java, which again is covered in the courses. The two year contract is really the only sacrifice you're making. Whether it's worth it or not is up to you. I have the coding interview in a few days. I'm still not sure if I will join if I pass the interview, but I want to know more, and studying for that interview will help me with any other coding related interview, so that in itself is worth the effort to me. I mainly want to get a solid grasp on what the course material will be in the program and what kind of job I can expect to get afterwards. If it's legit full stack development, I may go through with it, because I see that paying off big time and perhaps being worth it. Depending on the legitness of the program as a whole, you might be able to think of it as a two year training program. I mentioned before I got my last job through a training program, and it worked out pretty well, up until corona virus.

My previous job was basically data entry, but I was assigned to develop Python code to automate it. What do you do in data entry?
Well I had 2 data entry one was putting like financial information about checks. My most recent one is putting people health information into a database like if they have covid19 and other illnesses. It is kind of long hour and somewhat boring.
 
  • #105
Wait did you not get a GAship?

I entertain going back to school sometimes, but if I ever did, it wouldn't be for a job. I went to grad school specifically for a job, the job of GA LOL. You should have a GAship set up so you don't get into more debt. School should be fun, and it usually is fun. You shouldn't feel regret over going back. This could be a great opportunity for you. I wish you the best.
No they do not offer Graduate stipends to master student to the school I am going. With all this coronavirus thing I think I will only do 1or 2 classes at a time so it will not be a huge amount of debt and I think I will just pay some of the classes upfront.

I think this semester I will take computational complexity which is described as

" Introduction to resource-bounded computations, central complexity-theoretic concepts such as complexity classes, reducibility, completeness, and intractability. "

and another class called scheduling theory. I think this a good start for operations research.

I got mixed feeling about returning to school but my return will be more of as part time student and I do not know if I will spend much time on campus and another thing is it will be hard to network because a lot of people are afraid of gathering together unfortunately.
 
  • #106
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You can still look for jobs/internships while you're at it. I noticed that physics majors like to help each other out. This is likely true for math majors. I was interviewed today by someone who also had a physics degree. I suspect that a significant factor for the existence of that interview was because we both happen to have physics degrees. Something to think about. Lots of ways to network virtually. I recommend reaching out to as many people as you can. No one wants to hear this, but one method of doing that is via mass resume spamming.

In my experience, professors weren't super helpful to me in the job hunt, but they will help you find an internship, and they will help you find funding for your grad studies. Generally, PhD students are first in line for grad funding via scholarships, TAships and RAships. I happened to have a good relationship with two department heads, so I was able to receive funding for my masters. If I wanted a TAship, I could get one. RA funding is a little more tricky, but doable if you can make yourself useful for some research project.
 
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  • #107
I am from Ireland and I am currently waiting on my Leaving Cert results (exam results that are used by colleges when making offers to prospective students). I want to study mathematics. Today I decided to take a look at the modules that the college offers (the college I am hoping to be accepted to) and I basically chose all the ones I would want to study during the the first four years as an undergraduate. However, I just need a second opinion (or multiple) from people such as yourselves who have experience in the field of mathematics as I am keen to know what modules would best aid me in finding a lucrative career i.e. highly desirable skills that would be of benefit in today's world and that are sought after by governments and other institutions. I have a list of all the modules and I have no problem making them available here. I am thinking about getting a PhD in either Mathematics or Physics but that is so far down the road so I just want to focus on the undergraduate aspect of college for now. Any help from an accredited user will be appreciated,

thanks.
 
  • #108
CrysPhys
Education Advisor
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I am from Ireland and I am currently waiting on my Leaving Cert results (exam results that are used by colleges when making offers to prospective students). I want to study mathematics. Today I decided to take a look at the modules that the college offers (the college I am hoping to be accepted to) and I basically chose all the ones I would want to study during the the first four years as an undergraduate. However, I just need a second opinion (or multiple) from people such as yourselves who have experience in the field of mathematics as I am keen to know what modules would best aid me in finding a lucrative career i.e. highly desirable skills that would be of benefit in today's world and that are sought after by governments and other institutions. I have a list of all the modules and I have no problem making them available here. I am thinking about getting a PhD in either Mathematics or Physics but that is so far down the road so I just want to focus on the undergraduate aspect of college for now. Any help from an accredited user will be appreciated,

thanks.
If you want your personal scenario addressed, I highly recommend that you launch a separate thread. Tacking your scenario onto the end of an existing extra....ordinarily convoluted thread with 107 posts isn't probably going to get you the appropriate attention.
 
  • #109
If you want your personal scenario addressed, I highly recommend that you launch a separate thread. Tacking your scenario onto the end of an existing extra....ordinarily convoluted thread with 107 posts isn't probably going to get you the appropriate attention.
I did that right after I posted this
 

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