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Do anyons exist?

  1. Feb 15, 2012 #1

    atyy

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    Have anyons been experimentally detected (even indirectly, like gravitational waves via binary pulsars)?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 15, 2012 #2

    Borek

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    I have never heard about anyons so checked wikipedia:

    This gives a reference to http://arxiv.org/abs/cond-mat/0502406 (Camino, F.; Zhou, Wei; Goldman, V. (2005). "Realization of a Laughlin quasiparticle interferometer: Observation of fractional statistics". Physical Review B 72 (7)).

    Not that I know or understand much more now.
     
    Last edited: Feb 15, 2012
  4. Feb 15, 2012 #3

    atyy

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    Thanks! I asked the question because I was trying to read Stern's notes about anyons, and in the abstract he indicates that definitive evidence is lacking. Interestingly, he does comment on Camino et al's work

    "In a series of beautiful experiments of Camino et al., devices of the Fabry-Perot type were fabricated, and were measured in the integer and fractional quantum Hall regime. The results of these experiments are not yet fully understood, and several interpretations have been put forward in subsequent theoretical works (5; 85; 62; 58; 40; 90). While we will not get into a detailed discussion of these experiments here, we will describe the main results and comment on several factors that are crucial for their interpretation. ...

    These measurements reveal a major difference between the theoretical construct we introduced above and its experimental realization ...

    In any case, the anyonic nature of the quasi-particles is probably involved in the determination of the periods of the oscillations, but the precise way, and the role of the other factors, are not fully understood yet. In fact, different models of the experimental system yield different periodicities (58; 85; 40), none of which is presently able to fully account for the experimental observations. ...
     
    Last edited: Feb 15, 2012
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