Does a solenoid wrapped around a magnet meet resistance?

In summary: If the current is flowing through a coil of wire then that energy will be converted into electrical energy and that will cause the coil to heat up. In a speaker, of course, the coil is actually heating up the air inside the speaker cone.Perhaps we should ask what do you mean by "resistance" in this case?
  • #1
radaballer
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If a solenoid were wrapped around a bar magnet, and a charge were applied through the solenoid, would there be resistance?
 
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  • #2
I don't think you can 'apply a charge'. Do you mean that a electric current is passed through the solenoid?
 
  • #3
radaballer said:
If a solenoid were wrapped around a bar magnet, and a charge were applied through the solenoid, would there be resistance?

This is exactly the principle behind how speakers work. Either the solenoid or the magnet would be caused to move (depending on which is anchored more sturdily) due to the interaction of the resulting magnetic field. In a speaker, of course, it is the solenoid that moves and vibrates a cone with varying effects depending on the properties of the current passed through it.
 
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  • #4
Sturk200 said:
This is exactly the principle behind how speakers work. Either the solenoid or the magnet would be caused to move (depending on which is anchored more sturdily) due to the interaction of the resulting magnetic field. In a speaker, of course, it is the solenoid that moves and vibrates a cone with varying effects depending on the properties of the current passed through it.
Ok, will the current encounter resistance as it moves the magnet?
 
  • #5
Look at it from the point of view of conservation of energy.
 
  • #6
radaballer said:
Ok, will the current encounter resistance as it moves the magnet?

I'm not totally sure. I do know, however, that whatever force the charge carriers feel as a consequence of the magnetic field will be in a direction perpendicular to their velocity, so they will not be slowed down by the magnetic field itself. But they will be pushed to one side of the wire (see the Hall effect on wiki). It seems conceivable that there might be some added friction or something like that if all the charges are pushed into the wall of the wire, but I can't say anything definite about that.
 
  • #8
radaballer said:
Ok, will the current encounter resistance as it moves the magnet?

Perhaps we should ask what do you mean by "resistance" in this case?

If you want the magnet to do any work (including moving itself against air resistance or friction) then the energy to do that will have to come from somewhere (eg the power supply to the solenoid).
 

Related to Does a solenoid wrapped around a magnet meet resistance?

1. What is a solenoid?

A solenoid is a coil of wire that produces a magnetic field when an electric current is passed through it.

2. How does a solenoid wrapped around a magnet meet resistance?

When current flows through a solenoid wrapped around a magnet, the magnetic field generated by the solenoid interacts with the magnetic field of the magnet. This interaction creates a resistance to the flow of current through the solenoid, which can be measured using Ohm's law (V=IR).

3. Why does a solenoid wrapped around a magnet meet resistance?

The resistance is caused by the magnetic fields of the solenoid and magnet interacting with each other. This interaction creates an opposing force to the flow of current, which results in a resistance.

4. Can the resistance of a solenoid wrapped around a magnet be altered?

Yes, the resistance of a solenoid wrapped around a magnet can be altered by changing the strength of the magnetic field of either the solenoid or the magnet, or by changing the amount of current flowing through the solenoid.

5. What are some practical applications of a solenoid wrapped around a magnet meeting resistance?

Solenoids wrapped around magnets are used in many devices such as speakers, motors, and generators. The resistance of the solenoid is an important factor in determining the efficiency and functionality of these devices.

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