Does black hole stop light or time?

  • #1
Jim cook
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I have been told the speed of light is constant and does not waiver. This would make sense as light has no mass I am aware of.
Pictures taken during a solar eclipse seem to prove gravity bends light. Could it be however that the light is not bent, only the time/space light is traveling through is bent? And if this is a possibility, could a black hole be dark not because it's gravity is stopping light, but because it's gravity is stopping time/space? Could the bottom of the time/space curvature at a black hole be a doorway to another time/space dimension? Could this explain hawkings theory on desolving black holes, as they slowly are divided between two deminsions in an attempt to balance?
 

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  • #2
Drakkith
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Could it be however that the light is not bent, only the time/space light is traveling through is bent?

It's more accurate to say that the path through space that light takes is bent. Light, being an EM wave that spreads out through space after being emitted, is thus bent as well since it occupies a very large region of space.

And if this is a possibility, could a black hole be dark not because it's gravity is stopping light, but because it's gravity is stopping time/space?

No. The bending of spacetime is gravity. And spacetime is not something that can be "stopped" since it isn't moving and isn't capable of moving.

Could the bottom of the time/space curvature at a black hole be a doorway to another time/space dimension?

Almost certainly not. There has never been the slightest shred of evidence for the existence of multiple universes or other dimensions. Such concepts only show up in extremely hypothetical theories, none of which are supported by credible evidence.

Could this explain hawkings theory on desolving black holes, as they slowly are divided between two deminsions in an attempt to balance?

No.
 
  • #3
Jim cook
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It's more accurate to say that the path through space that light takes is bent. Light, being an EM wave that spreads out through space after being emitted, is thus bent as well since it occupies a very large region of space.



No. The bending of spacetime is gravity. And spacetime is not something that can be "stopped" since it isn't moving and isn't capable of moving.



Almost certainly not. There has never been the slightest shred of evidence for the existence of multiple universes or other dimensions. Such concepts only show up in extremely hypothetical theories, none of which are supported by credible evidence.



No.
1. Agreed

2. We agree light is not bent by gravity, the space light travels through is bent by gravity.

Space bent by gravity should alter the path of light, not terminate it. I view bent space just as most visual drawings depict, as a depression in space. For light to completely disappear would mean the curvature created by gravity has no bottom, or is infinite.

If the curve is not bottomless then light should not disappear, just move or be bent by curved space. It is my opinion that something else besides gravity would have to be involved for light to completely disappear.

3&4. I will detail later

Please respond
 
  • #4
Vanadium 50
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Jim, are you asking questions?
 
  • #5
jerromyjon
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If the curve is not bottomless then light should not disappear, just move or be bent by curved space.
The smallest stable orbit radius of light is only 3m. 3 meters out to the event horizon is a lot of space for light to be "trapped" in a black hole...
 
  • #6
PeroK
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1. Agreed

2. We agree light is not bent by gravity, the space light travels through is bent by gravity.

Space bent by gravity should alter the path of light, not terminate it. I view bent space just as most visual drawings depict, as a depression in space. For light to completely disappear would mean the curvature created by gravity has no bottom, or is infinite.

If the curve is not bottomless then light should not disappear, just move or be bent by curved space. It is my opinion that something else besides gravity would have to be involved for light to completely disappear.

3&4. I will detail later

Please respond

How would you like us to respond, given that you are just making this stuff up?

The mathematics of a black hole and the resulting paths of light rays is well established and understood.
 
  • #7
jerromyjon
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Could this explain hawkings theory on desolving black holes, as they slowly are divided between two deminsions in an attempt to balance?
The established theory is black hole "evaporation" and it is due to:
Hawking radiation
 
  • #8
Jim cook
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How would you like us to respond, given that you are just making this stuff up?

The mathematics of a black hole and the resulting paths of light rays is well established and understood.

How a black hole works is something nobody has observed or can observe, surely you know this?

What we know about how objects such as black holes work is currently only theory based on math, understood laws of physics and conjecture. I'm no Copernicus, I'm not a physicist, but I do like to observe and think.

Do you not use your brain and develop your own theory's of how things in the universe work?

Also to make the comment that I'm "making this stuff up" is narrow minded on your behalf.
 
  • #9
berkeman
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Thread closed temporarily for moderation...
 
  • #10
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Could it be however that the light is not bent, only the time/space light is traveling through is bent?

Yes, in the sense that the light is traveling on a geodesic--a straight line--in a curved spacetime geometry.

However, that does not imply all the other things you said.

How a black hole works is something nobody has observed or can observe, surely you know this?

We know how curved spacetime works; our knowledge of how a black hole works is a straightforward consequence of that.

Do you not use your brain and develop your own theory's of how things in the universe work?

Also to make the comment that I'm "making this stuff up" is narrow minded on your behalf.

Both of these comments are out of line. @PeroK was validly pointing out that the post of yours he responded to was speculation.

Also, you should not even try to develop your own theory of how things work until you thoroughly understand the theories that have already been developed and verified by massive amounts of evidence. GR is such a theory. You can't go beyond what's already known if you don't understand what's already known.
 
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  • #11
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The OP question has been answered, and personal speculation is out of bounds here on PF. Thread closed.
 

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