Doube slit electron with single slit photon emitter and detector

In summary, there is a double slit experiment with electrons where they have a 50/50 chance of going through each slit. Adding a photon emitter and detector over one slit will disturb the electrons, and if they are detected, we know they went through that slit. This means that there will be no interference pattern from the electrons that went through the detector slit. There are many discussions on this topic and searching for them will provide more information.
  • #1
superg33k
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Basically I am wondering if the act of detecting the path which the electron didn't go affects the interference pattern. But I'll be more specific.

So we have the double slit experiment with electrons, they have a 50/50 chance of going through each slit, and if we have this setup we will notice interference.

Now we will add a photon emitter and detector over one slit such that we will detect and electrons going through that slit by the photons path being disturbed. And for simplifications in this hypothetical experiment, this photon emitter and detector manages to disturb every particle that goes through that slit. Therefore if we detect an electron we know it went through the slit with the detector, if we don't detect the electron it must have gone through the other slit.

I know we won't get an interference pattern from the electrons that went through the detector slit, but will we get an interference pattern from the others?

I'm guessing there will be no interference pattern but please let me know if I am correct. And if there is a paper where someone has done this that would be excellent. Thanks!
 
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  • #2
No, there will be no interference pattern.

There are many threads discussing different scenarios, including this one. Use the search engine to find them.
 

Related to Doube slit electron with single slit photon emitter and detector

1. What is the purpose of a double slit electron with single slit photon emitter and detector setup?

The purpose of this setup is to demonstrate the wave-particle duality of matter and light. It shows that electrons, which are traditionally thought of as particles, can also exhibit wave-like behavior, and that photons, which are traditionally thought of as waves, can also behave like particles.

2. How does the double slit electron with single slit photon emitter and detector setup work?

In this setup, a beam of electrons is directed towards a barrier with two slits. On the other side of the barrier, a single slit is used to emit photons. These photons interact with the electrons, causing them to diffract and create an interference pattern on a detector screen. By observing the interference pattern, we can see the wave-like behavior of the electrons.

3. What is the significance of this experiment in the field of quantum mechanics?

This experiment is significant because it provides evidence for the wave-particle duality of matter, which is a fundamental concept in quantum mechanics. It also helps us understand the behavior of particles at the subatomic level and how they interact with each other.

4. Are there any real-world applications for this setup?

While this setup is primarily used for educational and research purposes, it has also been applied in the development of new technologies such as electron microscopes and particle accelerators. It also helps us understand the behavior of electrons in various materials, which is important in fields such as materials science and nanotechnology.

5. Can the double slit electron with single slit photon emitter and detector experiment be performed with other particles?

Yes, this experiment has been performed with other particles such as neutrons and atoms. The results are similar, further supporting the concept of wave-particle duality. However, the setup may vary depending on the properties of the particles being used.

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