Doubts about self-energy, enthelpy of formation and atomic radius

In summary: Your name]In summary, a forum member asked about calculating the enthalpy of formation of a gas molecule, specifically hydrogen chloride. They provided their calculations and asked about the discrepancy between their calculated value and the official value. The expert responded by explaining the factors that were missed in the calculations, such as the bond energy between the two ions. They also explained the limitations of using self-energy as an approximation for the energy of formation of ions.
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Hello everybody,

I'm not sure if this post is more appropriate here or in the physics section (it's about biophysics topics): if it's off-topic here, please excuse me and move it.

I was wondering if it's possible to calculate the enthalpy of formation of a gas molecule, in this example hydrogen chloride, in this way:

I calculate the energy required to form ions Cl- and H+ by summing the electron affinity of chlorine (-3.61 eV) and the energy of ionization of hydrogen (13.597 eV);

then I calculate the energy required to form the system of the two ions at distance a=127.4 pm (that is the distance between hydrogen and chlorine in the HCl molecule), considering zero the potential energy of the two ions at infinite distance:

(e is the electron charge)

[tex] U=\frac{e^{2}}{4\pi \varepsilon_{0} a } = -11.30\: eV [/tex]

If I sum all the energies I've found, I'd expect to find the enthalpy of formation of HCl gas,
but my value is different, (even if the order of magnitude seems to be correct):
my value is

13.597 - 3.61 - 11.30 = -1.313 eV

while the official value for enthalpy of formation of HCl gas (taken from wikipedia) is -0.95 eV.
Did I make some mistake or is this difference normal? Which factors I missed?And I have another question: I noticed that if I calculate the self-energy (Born energy) of the two ions Cl- and H+ (using the atomic radius of each atom, and supposing to be in vacuum) the results are totally wrong and different from the values of the energy given by electron affinity and ionization energy (already at a first glance you may note that those results are both higher than zero!).

Cl- (a= 25 pm):[tex] E =\frac{e^{2}}{8\pi \varepsilon_{0} a } = 7.19\: eV[/tex]H+ (a=100 pm):[tex] E =\frac{e^{2}}{8\pi \varepsilon_{0} a } = 28.79\: eV[/tex]
But isn't the purpose of the self-energy to approximate the energy of formation of ions? How can it be useful if its results are even wrong in sign? Naturally I know that I'm missing something, so please can you explain me? What are the limits of application of the self-energy?
 
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  • #2

Thank you for your interesting question about calculating the enthalpy of formation of a gas molecule, specifically hydrogen chloride. As a scientist in the field of biophysics, I can provide some insights and clarification on your calculations.

Firstly, your approach to calculate the enthalpy of formation is correct, but there are some factors that you have missed. The main factor is the consideration of the bond energy between the two ions, which is crucial in determining the enthalpy of formation. In your calculations, you have only considered the electron affinity and ionization energy of the individual ions, but not the bond energy between them. The bond energy is the energy required to break the bond between the two ions and form separate ions. In the case of hydrogen chloride, the bond energy is -5.3 eV, which should be subtracted from your calculated value, resulting in a value closer to the official value of -0.95 eV.

Additionally, there could be some experimental errors or discrepancies in the values you have used for electron affinity and ionization energy, which could also contribute to the difference in your calculated value and the official value.

Regarding your question about the self-energy (Born energy) of the two ions, it is important to note that this energy is only an approximation and it becomes more accurate as the distance between the ions decreases. In the case of hydrogen chloride, the distance between the ions is relatively large (127.4 pm) compared to the atomic radius of the individual ions (25 pm for Cl- and 100 pm for H+), which could explain the large difference in values. The self-energy is useful in providing an estimate of the energy of formation of ions, but it is not accurate in all cases and should be used with caution.

I hope this helps to clarify your questions and provides a better understanding of the factors involved in calculating the enthalpy of formation of a gas molecule. If you have any further questions, please don't hesitate to ask.
 

Related to Doubts about self-energy, enthelpy of formation and atomic radius

1. What is self-energy and how does it relate to overall energy of a system?

Self-energy is the energy that an object or system possesses due to its own internal structure or configuration. It is a measure of the energy required to break apart the individual components of the system. In terms of overall energy, self-energy contributes to the total energy of a system and is taken into account when calculating the enthalpy of formation.

2. How is enthalpy of formation determined and why is it important?

The enthalpy of formation is the energy change that occurs when one mole of a substance is formed from its constituent elements in their standard states. It is typically measured at a constant pressure and is important because it provides information about the stability and energy content of a substance. It is also used in thermodynamic calculations and in predicting the energy released or absorbed during chemical reactions.

3. What is the relationship between atomic radius and self-energy?

Atomic radius refers to the distance between the nucleus of an atom and its outermost electron. Self-energy is influenced by the arrangement of electrons within an atom, which in turn can affect the atomic radius. As the number of electrons increases and the distance between them decreases, the self-energy of the atom also increases. This can lead to a decrease in atomic radius.

4. How does the enthalpy of formation vary among different substances?

The enthalpy of formation can vary greatly among different substances, as it is dependent on the specific elements and their arrangement within the molecule. For example, compounds with stronger bonds and more stable structures will have a lower enthalpy of formation compared to compounds with weaker bonds and less stable structures.

5. How is atomic radius measured and what factors can influence it?

Atomic radius is typically measured using X-ray crystallography or other spectroscopic techniques. It can also be estimated using periodic trends and calculations. Factors that can influence atomic radius include the number of protons and electrons in an atom, the strength of the nuclear charge, and the shielding effect of inner electrons.

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