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Electric field due to a nonconducting sphere

  1. Feb 3, 2012 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    A spherical nonconducting surface of radius R is uniformly charged in its surface with net charge +Q. Calculate the electric field at a point P which is located at a distance R from the right border of the sphere. Calculate the electric field at a point R/2 at each side of the center of the sphere.


    2. Relevant equations
    I came up with this.
    Let p=Q/V
    dq = pdV
    V = f(x,y,z) = x^2 + y^2 + z^2 - R = 0
    ∂V = 2y∂y
    and Ep = ke2R-R dq/y^2 r

    3. The attempt at a solution
    After integration, Ep = 2keQ(ln2)/R r

    My question is, am I applying the concept of electric field due to a charge distribution in the correct way? I think I might have got it wrong with the dV component... Also, since the topic is Gauss Law, how am I supposed to use the concept of a gaussian surface to calculate electric field?
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data



    2. Relevant equations



    3. The attempt at a solution
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 3, 2012 #2
    My other attempt would be to construct a gaussian surface enclosing this sphere and express the electric field at p as Q/epsilon*(4*pi*R^2) which would come to kQ/R^2 (same as if i had taken it to be a point charge). THIS... IS... CONFUSING!
     
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