Electric field in a rotating frame

In summary, the conversation discusses a scenario where a particle is moving in a circular path with uniform velocity in the presence of a radially pointing electric field. The question is whether the field felt in the rest frame of the particle will be constant or a superposition of two oscillating fields out of phase by π/2. The direction of the electric field and centrifugal force coincide with the radial direction in the approximation that the particle's speed is much smaller than the speed of light. However, if the speed of the particle is comparable to the speed of light, relativity must be taken into consideration. More information is needed to determine the orientation of the x and y axes in the rotating frame of reference.
  • #1
Malamala
299
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Hello! I have a radially pointing electric field i.e. at a given radius, R, the electric field has the same magnitude and points radially around that circle of radius R. I have a particle moving around that circle of radius R, with uniform velocity (ignore for now how it gets to move like that). What is the field felt in the rest frame of the particle (assume that z-axis is the same for the lab and particle frame)? Will it be a constant field always pointing along the same direction, or will it appear as a superposition of 2 oscillating fields, one in x the other in y direction, out of phase by ##\pi/2## (basically like an electric field rotating in the x-y plane in the frame of the particle)?
 
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  • #2
In the approximation that speed of the particle v << c, the direction of thus designed electric field, and centrifugal force in addition, coincide with r, the radical direction of the reference frame of rotation. If v is comparable to c, we must consider relativity and that might be messy.

Malamala said:
Will it be a constant field always pointing along the same direction, or will it appear as a superposition of 2 oscillating fields, one in x the other in y direction, out of phase by π/2 (basically like an electric field rotating in the x-y plane in the frame of the particle)?
To reply we may need more information how you set not r and ##\phi## but x-axis and y-axis in the rotating frame of reference.
 
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1. What is an electric field in a rotating frame?

An electric field in a rotating frame refers to the force exerted on a charged particle in a rotating reference frame. This force is a combination of the electric field from the charged particle and the centrifugal force due to the rotation of the frame.

2. How does the electric field change in a rotating frame?

The electric field in a rotating frame can change in both magnitude and direction due to the addition of the centrifugal force. This can result in a non-uniform electric field, which can have significant effects on charged particles in the frame.

3. What is the Coriolis effect in relation to electric fields in a rotating frame?

The Coriolis effect is a result of the rotation of the frame and can cause the electric field to appear to be deflected in a direction perpendicular to the motion of the charged particle. This effect is important in understanding the behavior of charged particles in a rotating frame.

4. How does the electric field in a rotating frame affect charged particles?

The electric field in a rotating frame can cause charged particles to experience a force, which can result in a change in their trajectory or velocity. This can have significant consequences in various applications, such as in particle accelerators or in the study of planetary magnetospheres.

5. What are some real-world applications of electric fields in a rotating frame?

Electric fields in a rotating frame have various applications in fields such as physics, engineering, and geophysics. Some examples include the study of charged particle dynamics in rotating systems, the operation of centrifugal separators, and the behavior of charged particles in Earth's magnetosphere.

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