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Electrodynamics and Classical Mechanics?

  • #1

Main Question or Discussion Point

I am preparing for an exam which requires me to solve problems in electrodynamics and electrostatics problems along with classical mechanics and geometrical optics problems. The concern is that I do not have electrodynamics in my course in school so I have to study it completely on my own. I bought 'Introduction to Electrodynamics' by D.J. Griffiths but before I begin studying sincerely for the exam, I want to ask if it is possible to simultaneously study electrodynamics with classical mechanics. Thank you.
 

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  • #2
Orodruin
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Of course it is possible. The real question is if you can handle it and do well in both. This depends on what you define as doing well, how deep you need to go, how much time you have, and your aptitude for the subjects. It really is not something that can be answered by strangers on an internet forum.
 
  • #3
Of course it is possible. The real question is if you can handle it and do well in both. This depends on what you define as doing well, how deep you need to go, how much time you have, and your aptitude for the subjects. It really is not something that can be answered by strangers on an internet forum.
I have scored well in the practice tests for the mechanics exams and am doing fine at the moment. I started learning about div, gradient and curl when this question popped in my mind. I am willing to work hard to become a better physicist :)
 
  • #4
Vanadium 50
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If six weeks ago you were just starting to learn vector calc and introductory E&M, I think it's extremely likely that you are going too fast to learn the material in any depth.

I read War and Peace in twenty minutes. It's about Russia.
 
  • #5
If six weeks ago you were just starting to learn vector calc and introductory E&M, I think it's extremely likely that you are going too fast to learn the material in any depth.

I read War and Peace in twenty minutes. It's about Russia.
Unfortunately, that is the problem. The exam I'm taking, which is due this November is intended for high school juniors, but I don't have any EM in my course this year. I'm having to learn it completely by myself.
 
  • #6
jtbell
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Is this for the Physics Olympiad? (I suspect it is, based on your previous posts.) If so, does it really require Griffiths-level E&M (upper-level undergraduate), as opposed to Halliday/Resnick- or Young/Freedman-level (first-year undergraduate)?
 
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  • #7
Is this for the Physics Olympiad? (I suspect it is, based on your previous posts.) If so, does it really require Griffiths-level E&M (upper-level undergraduate), as opposed to Halliday/Resnick- or Young/Freedman-level (first-year undergraduate)?
It requires Halliday/Resnick level electrodynamics.
 
  • #8
jtbell
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Then Griffiths is above the level you want. In the US at least, students who use Griffiths have already taken a course on the level of Halliday/Resnick.
 
  • #9
ZapperZ
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I am preparing for an exam which requires me to solve problems in electrodynamics and electrostatics problems along with classical mechanics and geometrical optics problems. The concern is that I do not have electrodynamics in my course in school so I have to study it completely on my own. I bought 'Introduction to Electrodynamics' by D.J. Griffiths but before I begin studying sincerely for the exam, I want to ask if it is possible to simultaneously study electrodynamics with classical mechanics. Thank you.
It requires Halliday/Resnick level electrodynamics.
I have scored well in the practice tests for the mechanics exams and am doing fine at the moment. I started learning about div, gradient and curl when this question popped in my mind. I am willing to work hard to become a better physicist :)
Based on that last quote, I think you are using a bazooka to kill a mosquito.

Zz.
 

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