Energy Lost due to friction

  • #1

Homework Statement


A team of dogs drags a 114 kg sled 1.92 km over a horizontal surface at a constant speed. The coefficient of friction between the sled and the snow is 0.124. The acceleration of gravity is 9.8 m/s 2 . Find the work done by the dogs.

Answer in units of kJ.

Find the energy lost due to friction. Answer in units of kJ.

Homework Equations


I don't know, I think that might be part of my problem

The Attempt at a Solution


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For the first one, I did 114 x 9.8 x 1.92 x 0.124 to get 265.982976, which was correct

but for the second part, I tried to do 114 x 9.8 x 1.92 to get 2145.024, which would be the energy with no friction, right? Then I subtracted the energy with friction from the energy without friction to get 1879.041, but that was wrong. What am I doing wrong? Wouldn't it make sense that you could find energy lost like this? Is there a formula?
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
haruspex
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Find the work done by the dogs.

Answer in units of kJ.

Find the energy lost due to friction. Answer in units of kJ.
You calculated the work done by the dogs. Where has that work gone? PE? KE? Anywhere else?
 
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  • #3
Wouldn't it all have gone to KE?
 
  • #4
Wouldn't it all have gone to KE?
Sorry if I'm completely missing your point, I missed the class where they talked about this so I'm a bit lost
 
  • #5
haruspex
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Sorry if I'm completely missing your point, I missed the class where they talked about this so I'm a bit lost
How do you assess change in KE?
 
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How do you assess change in KE?

I know that the kinetic energy formula is 1/2mv^2, so to find change in KE I would just use that formula to get the KE and subtract final KE from initial KE
 
  • #7
haruspex
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I know that the kinetic energy formula is 1/2mv^2, so to find change in KE I would just use that formula to get the KE and subtract final KE from initial KE
Right. Is the speed changing?
 
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  • #11
Nathanael
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What is the change in energy of the sled?
 
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  • #12
Wouldn't it also be 0? Becasue the sled is attached to the dogs
 
  • #13
Nathanael
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So if the sled didn't gain any energy, what happened to the energy (from the work done by the dogs) from part one?
 
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  • #16
Nathanael
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It became friction energy?
Right.
Well... more correctly, you should say something like, "it was lost through friction." But you have the right idea.

It wouldn't be called "friction energy", it would be in the form of "thermal energy" (because the snow would be a bit warmer).

does that even make sense?
Haha, not exactly, but you have the right idea.
 
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  • #17
Right.
Well... more correctly, you should say something like, "it was lost through friction." But you have the right idea.

It wouldn't be called "friction energy", it would be in the form of "thermal energy" (because the snow would be a bit warmer).


Haha, not exactly, but you have the right idea.
Okay I think I'm starting to get it, all of the energy has to go somewhere, so in this case it all became thermal energy
 
  • #19
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Wait, but that still doesn't answer the amount of energy lost! What's the formula?
 
  • #20
you don't need a formula for this one
Wait, but that still doesn't answer the amount of energy lost! What's the formula?
 

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