Exploring the Mystery of Fractured Steel Specimens

In summary, the conversation discusses the phenomenon of a steel specimen feeling warmer after being fractured under tensile stress. The participants consider the deformation of the metal before failure, the loading process of the steel, and the significance of uniform elongation, total elongation, and fracture surface. They also mention the role of internal friction in the metal and how it dissipates energy as heat during plastic deformation. Additionally, the conversation touches on the process of forging die steel from a steel ingot and the issue of cracks forming during the first 10 strokes of the hammer. The participants rule out a fault in the ingot and seek help in resolving the issue.
  • #1
TheClincher
8
0
A question has been puzzling me: why does a steel specimen feel warmer after it is fractured via applied tensile stress?
 
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  • #2
Think about the deformation of the metal before failure. What is happening during the loading of the steel? What is the significance of the uniform elongation, total elongation and fracture surface?

The other factor is the internal friction in the metal.
 
  • #3
When a metal is plastically deformed it absorbs energy. (the area inder the stress strain curve is a measure of this). This energy is dissipated as heat and as new surface energy when the metal breaks. A brittle cast iron (that is little plastic deformation) will not get as warm

Stay Hep
Greg
 
  • #4
well i have to forge die steel from a steel ingot(casted). After heating it to the correct temperature the piece is brought under the hammer and the forging process begins.
in the first 10 strokes of the hammer cracks form on the surface and sometimes the piece breaks into 2 or more parts.What am i doing wrong.?
I know the first thing that comes to mind is that there is a fault in the ingot but that's not it because some come out fine , some have minor cracks on them that can be grinded( IN the same heat of the induction furnace.).
HElP.!
 

Related to Exploring the Mystery of Fractured Steel Specimens

1. What is the purpose of exploring the mystery of fractured steel specimens?

The purpose of exploring the mystery of fractured steel specimens is to understand the causes of steel failures and to develop better methods for preventing them. This research can also help improve the safety and reliability of steel structures in various industries.

2. What techniques are used to study fractured steel specimens?

There are several techniques used to study fractured steel specimens, including optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and energy dispersive spectroscopy. These techniques allow scientists to examine the microstructure, chemical composition, and other properties of the fractured steel.

3. What are some common factors that lead to steel fractures?

Some common factors that lead to steel fractures include excessive loading, corrosion, and material defects. Manufacturing processes, environmental conditions, and maintenance practices can also contribute to steel failures.

4. How can studying fractured steel specimens benefit the industry?

Studying fractured steel specimens can benefit the industry in several ways. It can help identify potential problems and improve design and manufacturing processes to prevent future failures. This research can also lead to the development of more durable and reliable materials for various applications.

5. What are some potential applications of this research?

This research on fractured steel specimens has various potential applications in industries such as construction, automotive, aerospace, and oil and gas. It can also be applied to other materials, such as aluminum and titanium, to improve their performance and prevent failures.

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