Ferroelectric RAM operation

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In summary, DRAM uses a schematic unit cell with a capacitor and a switch to represent a "zero" or "one" state. In FeRAM, a ferroelectric crystal is used instead of a capacitor, requiring the ability to switch polarization by attaching a voltage of the opposite sign. The solution for this is more complicated and it is unknown how it is solved. A .pdf file is attached for reference.
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Hi,
the schematic unit cell in DRAM is drawn below:
https://docs.google.com/file/d/0BzvjZoZeQg3nd1JYNTdGOTdIS2c/edit?usp=sharing

Here, "zero" or "one" are simply capacitor charged or not. So to write a bit, we attach (or not) a source (Vcc) voltage with switch WBIT.

In the case of FeRAM, we have a ferroelectric crystal inside a capacitor. Now, to write a bit, we have to switch polarization of ferroelectric, thus we have to be able to attach a voltage also of the opposite sign. First idea is to replace source and ground, but it is probably not smart solution. It seems to be more complicated. Does anybody know how is it solved?
 
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Attached is .pdf
 

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  • #3
So, the voltage is somehow reversed. Thank you.
 

1. How does Ferroelectric RAM (FeRAM) store data?

FeRAM uses a ferroelectric material, typically lead zirconate titanate (PZT), to store data in the form of tiny electric dipoles. These dipoles can be switched between two stable states, corresponding to the binary values of 0 and 1, by applying an electric field.

2. What are the advantages of using FeRAM over other types of memory?

FeRAM has several advantages over other types of memory, including non-volatile storage (data is retained even when power is removed), fast read and write speeds, low power consumption, and high endurance (ability to withstand a large number of read/write cycles).

3. How does FeRAM differ from Dynamic Random Access Memory (DRAM) and Static Random Access Memory (SRAM)?

FeRAM differs from DRAM and SRAM in terms of its storage mechanism. DRAM uses capacitors to store data, while SRAM uses flip-flops. FeRAM, on the other hand, uses ferroelectric dipoles. Additionally, FeRAM has the advantage of non-volatile storage, whereas DRAM and SRAM require power to retain data.

4. What is the operating temperature range for FeRAM?

The operating temperature range for FeRAM is typically between -40°C to 85°C. However, some manufacturers have developed FeRAM with extended temperature ranges, up to 125°C, for use in harsh environments.

5. Can FeRAM be used in all electronic devices?

While FeRAM has several advantages over other types of memory, it is not yet widely used in all electronic devices. It is primarily used in specific applications that require fast and reliable non-volatile memory, such as automotive, aerospace, and medical devices. However, as technology advances and production costs decrease, FeRAM may become more prevalent in consumer electronics as well.

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