Find the electric field and force at a point in 3d space

In summary, a student uploaded a problem (2.1) and asked for help, providing two attempts at a solution. Another user advised the student to simplify the Coulomb constant and deal with one charge at a time. The student then reported solving the problem and moved on to problem 2.2, which was also confirmed as correct. The student then moved on to problem 2.3.
  • #1
DODGEVIPER13
672
0

Homework Statement


Uploaded Problem 2.1


Homework Equations


Etotal=Eq1+eq2


The Attempt at a Solution


On problem 2.1 I need quite a bit of help here. I am not really sure how to approach this I have done some work but it is highly incorrect. I hand wrote my solution, so I will upload that too.
 

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  • #2
Here is my redo I saw a problem in the book that looked kinda close so i tried to follow it but it really wast that close in the end
 

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  • #3
Your second attempt is better as it is taking the vectors into account, but I think you're trying to do too much at once.

Start by reducing the Coulomb constant to a single constant: ##k = \frac{1}{4 \pi \epsilon_o}##. That way you don't need to drag the whole thing through the calculations.

Next, Deal with one charge at a time. Find the field at the point in question due to Q2 alone, since it's a fixed feature. Call that E2.

Then find the contribution by Q1, leaving just the Q1 as a variable (so you'll end up with some vector constant, say D, multiplied by Q1 to yield the vector components of the E-field due to Q1 at the point in question). Call that E1.

At this point you should be able to deal component-wise with the various E vectors to address the requirements of the questions.
 
  • #4
well I figured it out but thanks for the reply I get Q1=-8.323 nC and Q1=-45nC. Well I didnt figure it out but I saw a solution I understood
 
  • #5
hey can you check my 2.2 answer though I feel that it is right I get 40nC. Sorry my upload wasnt super clear!
 

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  • #6
DODGEVIPER13 said:
hey can you check my 2.2 answer though I feel that it is right I get 40nC. Sorry my upload wasnt super clear!

I don't follow your working, but answer looks okay to me.
 
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  • #7
Thanks I have moved onto 2.3 and broke it off onto another post as you has said earlier. Thanks again
 

1. What is the electric field at a point in 3D space?

The electric field at a point in 3D space is a measure of the force that would be exerted on a stationary charged particle at that point. It is a vector quantity, meaning it has both magnitude and direction.

2. How is the electric field calculated at a point in 3D space?

The electric field at a point in 3D space can be calculated using Coulomb's Law, which states that the electric field is equal to the force between two charged particles divided by the distance between them squared. It can also be calculated by taking the derivative of the electric potential at that point.

3. What factors affect the electric field at a point in 3D space?

The electric field at a point in 3D space is affected by the magnitude and distribution of nearby charges, as well as the distance between the point and the charges. It is also influenced by the presence of any conductors or insulators in the surrounding space.

4. How is the force calculated at a point in 3D space?

The force at a point in 3D space can be calculated by multiplying the electric field at that point by the charge of the particle that is being acted upon. This will give the force in Newtons (N).

5. How can the electric field and force be visualized in 3D space?

The electric field and force can be visualized using vector fields, where the magnitude and direction of the electric field or force are represented by arrows at different points in 3D space. This allows for a better understanding of the behavior of electric fields and forces in a given region.

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