Finding the quantity of a radioactive substance and standard units

In summary, when using the formula T1/2=.693/lambda to find the quantity of a radioactive substance after a half life of time t, it is not necessary to convert the time to standard units. However, t and T1/2 must be in the same units. Lambda will have the correct units of reciprocal time included and if given lambda without units, there is not enough information to find T1/2.
  • #1
EIRE2003
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When finding the quantity of a radioactive substance remaining after a half life of time t, using the formula, T1/2=.693/lambda. do u have to convert the time to standard units, the second, if it is in mins, or yrs or days or months watever?
 
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  • #2
EIRE2003 said:
When finding the quantity of a radioactive substance remaining after a half life of time t, using the formula, T1/2=.693/lambda. do u have to convert the time to standard units, the second, if it is in mins, or yrs or days or months watever?

No, but t and T1/2 has to be in same units.
 
  • #3
EIRE2003 said:
When finding the quantity of a radioactive substance remaining after a half life of time t, using the formula, T1/2=.693/lambda. do u have to convert the time to standard units, the second, if it is in mins, or yrs or days or months watever?

Lambda will have the appropriate units of reciprocal time included. If you know the half life and solve for lambda, the answer will have the correct units for lambda. If you are given lambda and calculate T1/2, it will have the correct units. If you are given lambda without units, you don't have enough information to find T1/2.
 

Related to Finding the quantity of a radioactive substance and standard units

1. How do you find the quantity of a radioactive substance?

The quantity of a radioactive substance can be determined by measuring its activity, or the rate at which it decays. This can be done using a Geiger counter or other radiation detectors.

2. What are the standard units for measuring radioactive substances?

The standard unit for measuring radioactive substances is the Becquerel (Bq), which represents one decay per second. Other commonly used units include Curie (Ci) and Gray (Gy).

3. How do you convert between different units of radioactive measurement?

To convert between different units of radioactive measurement, you can use conversion factors. For example, 1 Curie is equal to 3.7 x 10^10 Becquerels. You can also use online conversion calculators for easier and more accurate conversions.

4. What is the half-life of a radioactive substance?

The half-life of a radioactive substance is the time it takes for half of the substance to decay into a more stable form. This can vary greatly depending on the substance, ranging from fractions of a second to billions of years.

5. How does the quantity of a radioactive substance affect its level of danger?

The quantity of a radioactive substance plays a major role in determining its level of danger. Higher quantities of radioactive materials can result in greater levels of radiation and potential harm to living organisms. Proper handling and disposal of radioactive substances is crucial to minimizing their danger.

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