Force on a part of a spherical shell on the other

In summary, the conversation discusses how to calculate the electrostatic force on one part of a conducting sphere due to the other part, which has a charge q. The suggested method is to divide the parts into infinitely thin discs and calculate the force between them, but this is deemed messy. Another suggested approach is to use the Maxwell stress tensor, although the person in the conversation is not familiar with it.
  • #1
Brilli
48
0

Homework Statement


Given there is a conducting sphere which has a charge q on it. A plane cuts the sphere into 2 form a distance r from centre. How can we calculate the electrostatic force on one part on either side of the plane due ro the other part?

Homework Equations

The Attempt at a Solution


I tried to divide one part and divided it into infinitely thin disc. Then i calculated the force due to this disc on the other part of sphere. This was done again by deviding the other part into small parts and then finding force due to the infinitesimal disc on the other infinitesimal didc and then integrate it. Ghis process looks very messy. Is there any other way yo solve it?
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
Are you familiar with the Maxwell stress tensor?
 
  • #3
Orodruin said:
Are you familiar with the Maxwell stress tensor?
Nope. But thanks for the reply. I will refer to it and try it out.
 

Related to Force on a part of a spherical shell on the other

1. What is the formula for calculating the force on a part of a spherical shell on the other?

The formula for calculating the force on a part of a spherical shell on the other is F = G * (m1 * m2) / r^2, where G is the gravitational constant, m1 and m2 are the masses of the two spherical shells, and r is the distance between them.

2. How does the distance between the two spherical shells affect the force?

The force between two spherical shells is inversely proportional to the square of the distance between them. This means that as the distance increases, the force decreases, and vice versa.

3. Can the force between two spherical shells be repulsive?

No, the force between two spherical shells can only be attractive due to the nature of gravity. If the masses are equal, the force will be zero because the forces will cancel each other out.

4. How does the mass of the two spherical shells affect the force?

The force between two spherical shells is directly proportional to the product of their masses. This means that as the masses increase, the force also increases, and vice versa.

5. Is the force between two spherical shells affected by the presence of other masses?

Yes, the force between two spherical shells can be affected by the presence of other masses. This is because the gravitational force is a vector quantity and the presence of other masses can change the direction and magnitude of the force.

Similar threads

  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
4
Views
959
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
12
Views
411
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
2
Views
255
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
26
Views
3K
Replies
5
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
19
Views
3K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
5
Views
4K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
9
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
8
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
15
Views
4K
Back
Top