Gravitational force between the moon and the Earth

In summary, the gravitational force between the moon and Earth is approximately 1.98 x 10^20 Newtons and is responsible for keeping the moon in its orbit. This force can be calculated using the formula F = G x (m1 x m2)/d^2, where G is the gravitational constant, m1 and m2 are the masses of the two objects, and d is the distance between them. The force can change slightly due to variations in the distance between the two objects, but this has a minimal impact. The gravitational force also affects ocean tides, causing high tides on the side of the Earth facing the moon and low tides on the opposite side. Additionally, the gravitational force affects the rotation of
  • #1
Victorian91
18
0
Hi, I am just wandering based on the formula..

F = GMm/r^2


Is the gravitational force exerted by the Earth on the moon is the same as the gravitational force exerted by the moon on Earth ?

It should be the same right?
Both lies on a same radius..

Can someone clarify this..

Thanks..
 
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  • #2
Hint

Look up Newton's laws on Google. You should easily be able to figure it out looking an Newton's three laws of motion.
 
  • #3


I can confirm that the formula you have mentioned is the universal law of gravitation, which states that the force of gravitational attraction between two objects is directly proportional to the product of their masses and inversely proportional to the square of the distance between them.

In regards to your question, the gravitational force between the Earth and the moon is indeed the same in magnitude, but opposite in direction. This is known as Newton's third law of motion, which states that for every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction.

So, while the Earth exerts a gravitational force on the moon, the moon also exerts an equal and opposite force on the Earth. This is what keeps the moon in its orbit around the Earth and causes the tides on our planet.

Furthermore, the distance between the Earth and the moon does not remain constant, as the moon's orbit is elliptical. This means that the gravitational force between the two objects will vary slightly as the distance changes.

I hope this clarifies your understanding of the gravitational force between the moon and the Earth. It is a fundamental force of nature that plays a crucial role in the dynamics of our solar system.
 

Related to Gravitational force between the moon and the Earth

What is the gravitational force between the moon and the Earth?

The gravitational force between the moon and Earth is approximately 1.98 x 10^20 Newtons. This force is responsible for keeping the moon in its orbit around the Earth.

How is the gravitational force between the moon and the Earth calculated?

The gravitational force between two objects can be calculated using the formula F = G x (m1 x m2)/d^2, where G is the gravitational constant, m1 and m2 are the masses of the two objects, and d is the distance between them.

Does the gravitational force between the moon and the Earth ever change?

Yes, the gravitational force between the moon and Earth can change slightly due to variations in the distance between them. This is due to the elliptical shape of the moon's orbit around the Earth. However, the change is very small and does not have a significant impact on the overall force.

How does the gravitational force between the moon and the Earth affect tides?

The gravitational force between the moon and the Earth is one of the main factors that influence ocean tides. As the moon orbits around Earth, its gravitational pull causes the oceans to bulge towards the moon, creating high tides. The areas on Earth that are furthest from the moon experience low tides.

Does the gravitational force between the moon and the Earth have any other effects?

Yes, the gravitational force between the moon and Earth also affects the Earth's rotation and the moon's rotation. The Earth's rotation is slightly slowed down by the moon's gravitational pull, and the moon's rotation is also affected, causing it to always show the same face to the Earth. This is known as tidal locking.

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