Heat Exchanger: +40C rise at 16 liters/minute flow rate

In summary, the conversation revolves around calculating the rate of heat transfer between hot external water and cold internal water in a pipe. The person is seeking advice on how to proceed with calculating the internal heat transfer coefficient, specifically using the Nusselt number equation. They are unsure if this is the correct approach and have been researching different sources for information on the Nusselt number and its calculation.
  • #1
Thread moved from the technical forums to the schoolwork forums
Summary:: How to calculate the rate of heat transfer between hot external water and cold internal water in a pipe.

The image attached is my attempt at the question however, I find myself stuck trying to work out internal and external heat transfer coefficient.
1627395864174.png
 

Attachments

  • 1627395717120.png
    1627395717120.png
    19.9 KB · Views: 111
  • 1627395764149.png
    1627395764149.png
    20.2 KB · Views: 113
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
What are your thoughts on how to proceed so far, say, first for the case of the internal heat transfer coefficient?
 
  • Like
Likes Edwardminett
  • #3
Chestermiller said:
What are your thoughts on how to proceed so far, say, first for the case of the internal heat transfer coefficient?
I'm not to sure, most places I searched said use the Nusselt number equation but I'm not sure if this is correct or how to calculate this?
 
  • #4
Edwardminett said:
I'm not to sure, most places I searched said use the Nusselt number equation but I'm not sure if this is correct or how to calculate this?
Tell me your understanding of how the Nusselt number is estimated. Where have you researched so far?
 

Suggested for: Heat Exchanger: +40C rise at 16 liters/minute flow rate

Replies
56
Views
2K
Replies
6
Views
707
Replies
2
Views
1K
Replies
10
Views
1K
Replies
13
Views
1K
Replies
1
Views
853
Replies
3
Views
2K
Replies
3
Views
1K
Back
Top