Highest Pressure Gases: Physics Experiments & Properties

In summary, the conversation discusses the search for high-pressure physics experiments specifically on gases and phase changes, excluding plasma. Two potential resources are provided: a study on the design of a gas target for use at Jefferson Laboratory, and a paper on a high-pressure polarized $^3$He gas target for nuclear physics experiments. In most cases, achieving high enough pressure results in the solidification of the gas.
  • #1
Albertgauss
Gold Member
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Does anyone know where I can physics related to the highest pressures that have been achieved for any gas in a lab, and if any new properties of such gases have been seen? There is all kinds of high pressure physics for solids and liquid states of matter, but I can't find anything about high pressure experiments on Gases, phase changes, etc. Also, I don't mean plasma, unless its part of a phase change of a system where high pressure on gases has been studied.
 
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  • #2
In most cases getting pressure high enough makes things solid.
 
  • #3
"Does anyone know where I can (missing verb?) physics related to the highest pressures ..."

Care to complete the thought?
 
  • #4
Here are two that may interest you:

Title:Thermomechanical design of a static gas target for electron accelerators
Authors: B. Brajuskovic, T. O'Connor, R. J. Holt, J. Reneker, D. Meekin, P. Solvignon
(Submitted on 25 Jun 2013)
Abstract: Gas targets are often used at accelerator facilities. A design of high-pressure gas cells that are suitable for hydrogen and helium isotopes at relatively high electron beam currents is presented. In particular, we consider rare gas targets, $^3$H$_2$ and $^3$He. In the design, heat transfer and mechanical integrity of the target cell are emphasized. ANSYS 12 was used for the thermo-mechanical studies of the target cell. Since the ultimate goal in this study was to design a gas target for use at the Jefferson Laboratory (JLab), particular attention is given to the typical operating conditions found there. It is demonstrated that an aluminum alloy cell can meet the required design goals.
http://arxiv.org/abs/1306.6000

A High-Pressure Polarized $^3$He Gas Target for Nuclear Physics Experiments Using A Polarized Photon Beam
http://arxiv.org/abs/0911.3647
 
  • #5
Does plasma count? Inertial confinement fusion achieves some pretty high pressures for a very short time, when the fuel pellet is imploded.
 

Related to Highest Pressure Gases: Physics Experiments & Properties

1. What is the highest pressure gas that has been achieved in a laboratory setting?

The highest pressure gas achieved in a laboratory setting is approximately 600 gigapascals, which was achieved by compressing a sample of hydrogen gas.

2. How do scientists create high pressure gases in experiments?

Scientists use a device called a diamond anvil cell to compress gases to high pressures. This device consists of two diamonds with a small space between them, where the gas is placed and then compressed by applying pressure to the diamonds.

3. What are some properties of high pressure gases?

High pressure gases have a higher density, lower volume, and higher temperature compared to the same gas at normal pressure. They also exhibit different chemical and physical properties, such as increased reactivity and phase changes at lower temperatures.

4. What are the potential applications of high pressure gases?

High pressure gases have many potential applications, including in the production of synthetic diamonds, the study of exotic states of matter, and the creation of new materials with unique properties. They also have potential uses in industries such as energy, aerospace, and materials science.

5. Are there any risks associated with working with high pressure gases?

Yes, there are risks associated with working with high pressure gases, as they can be extremely volatile and potentially explosive. It is important for scientists to follow strict safety protocols, including wearing protective gear and working in a controlled environment, when conducting experiments with high pressure gases.

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