Hooke's law and kinetic energy?

In summary, a 0.75 kg block with a spring constant of 735 N/m is held at rest against a spring compressed by 27.0 cm. When released, the block moves towards a loop on a frictionless surface. To determine the kinetic energy of the block when the spring is compressed 13.5 cm, we can use the equations F = kx and Ek = (1/2)mv^2. We must also consider the energy stored in the spring and use conservation of energy to determine the block's velocity at different points. Additionally, the radius of the loop can be found by using the same principles to determine the minimum velocity needed for the block to make it around the top of the loop.
  • #1
jevillan
8
0

Homework Statement


A 0.75 kg block is held at rest against a spring compressing it 27.0 cm. The spring constant is 735 N/m. The block is released and it begins to move toward a loop across a frictionless surface. How much kinetic energy does the block have when the spring is compressed 13.5 cm? What is the radius of the loop if it just makes it around the top of the loop?


Homework Equations


F = kx
Ek = (1/2)mv^2


The Attempt at a Solution


F = kx
F = 735*0.27 = 198.45

So far I've found the force when the spring is compressed 27 cm...not too sure how that value of Force is even relevant to finding the answer :S
 
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  • #2
Investigate the energy stored in the spring and the use of conservation of energy to determine the velocity of the block at various points along its journey.
 

Related to Hooke's law and kinetic energy?

1. What is Hooke's law?

Hooke's law is a scientific principle that describes the relationship between the force applied to an elastic material and the resulting deformation or change in its length. It states that the force applied is directly proportional to the amount of deformation produced.

2. What is the formula for Hooke's law?

The formula for Hooke's law is F = -kx, where F is the force applied, k is the spring constant (a measure of the stiffness of the material), and x is the displacement or change in length of the material.

3. How does Hooke's law relate to kinetic energy?

Hooke's law does not directly relate to kinetic energy. However, the potential energy stored in a material due to its deformation can be converted into kinetic energy when the material returns to its original shape. This is known as elastic potential energy and is described by Hooke's law.

4. What factors affect the amount of kinetic energy in a system?

The amount of kinetic energy in a system is affected by the mass and velocity of the object. As the mass or velocity of an object increases, so does its kinetic energy. Additionally, the type of material and its elasticity can also affect the amount of kinetic energy produced from a given force.

5. How is Hooke's law used in real-life applications?

Hooke's law has many real-life applications, including in the design of springs, shock absorbers, and elastic materials used in sports equipment. It is also used in engineering and construction to calculate the amount of force a structure can withstand before deforming or breaking. Additionally, Hooke's law is used in medical devices such as prosthetics to create realistic and functional movements.

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