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Horizontal Acceleration of a Stone

  1. Sep 27, 2012 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data

    A stone is thrown horizontally from a cliff 25 m high and lands on the ground 22 m from the foot of the cliff. What is the horizontal acceleration on the stone?


    2. Relevant equations

    a = Δv/Δt = (vfinal - vinitial) / (tfinal - tinitial)


    3. The attempt at a solution

    ??? I don't know where to start!! Please help!
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 27, 2012 #2

    lewando

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    The key word is "horizontal" acceleration [okay, two words]. Once the stone is tossed, what forces are acting on it? What vertical forces? What horizontal forces?
     
  4. Sep 27, 2012 #3
    The vertical forces are gravity which has a velocity of 9.8 m/s.
    I don't think there are any horizontal forces (if you exclude wind resistance).

    So is the horizontal acceleration 0 m/s2?
     
  5. Sep 27, 2012 #4

    lewando

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    Good.
     
  6. Sep 27, 2012 #5
    Thank you for helping me.
    How would you recommend finding the vertical acceleration of a problem like this?

    Would it just be 9.8 m/s2?
     
  7. Sep 27, 2012 #6

    lewando

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    That is the magnitude of acceleration due to gravity, near the surface of Earth. It is in the down direction.
     
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