How can the energy stored in a spring be calculated?

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In summary, the conversation was about a question regarding the use of linear motion equations and kinetic/potential energy equations to solve a problem. The person had already found the answer to part (i) but was unsure about part (ii). They had tried different methods but were not successful. The other person gave a hint to use the equation for energy stored in a spring. The summary also includes a reminder to use the provided homework help template for future inquiries.
  • #1
smr101
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Hi, I've attached the question and answer below.

I've got (i) but I'm unsure how to achieve the answer for (ii).

I've tried using the linear motion equations and also a combination of the kinetic/potential energy questions but haven't had any luck as of yet...

Help is much appreciated, thanks!

uTp1B.jpg
 
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  • #2
smr101 said:
Hi, I've attached the question and answer below.

I've got (i) but I'm unsure how to achieve the answer for (ii).

I've tried using the linear motion equations and also a combination of the kinetic/potential energy questions but haven't had any luck as of yet...

Help is much appreciated, thanks!

uTp1B.jpg

(In the future, please use the Homework Help Template that you are provided, and fill out each section. That makes it easier for us to help.)

What method did you use for (i)? Can you show us your calculations?

For (ii), Hint -- what is the equation for the energy stored in a spring?
 
  • #3
berkeman said:
(In the future, please use the Homework Help Template that you are provided, and fill out each section. That makes it easier for us to help.)

What method did you use for (i)? Can you show us your calculations?

For (ii), Hint -- what is the equation for the energy stored in a spring?

Hi, thanks, will do.

I used the kinetic energy formula 1/2mv^2 for the first answer.

I've been able to work it out using that formula, thanks, I wasn't aware of it previously.
 

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