How can you calculate change in magnetic flux?

  • Thread starter michaelw
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  • #1
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Here is the problem

A long and narrow rectangular loop of wire is moving toward the bottom of the page with a speed of 0.020m/s (see the drawing). The loop is leaving a region in which a 2.4-T magnetic field exists; the magnetic field outside this region is zero. During a time of 2.0s, what is the magnitude of the change in the magnetic flux?

Please help me.. how do I do this? :confused: :confused:
 

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  • #2
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hrm...

Since the magnetic flux is completely perpendicular to the loop, the magnetic flux at anytime is B*A, where A is only the area that is within the magnetic field.

Magnetic flux = B*A you can differentiate this equation with respect to time to find the rate of change of flux, and relate dA/dt to the information given in the question.

Because you are looking for the change only, you do not need to the know the total area, or the length, of the loop.
 
  • #3
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is there a way to do it without involving calculus :)?
 
  • #4
dextercioby
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You can do it,if the velocity is constant...(I think it is).

So yes.

[tex] \Delta \Phi =B \Delta A [/tex]

What is the variation of the area...?

Daniel.
 
  • #5
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thanks :)
are the units for magnetic flux Tm^2 (the SI unit)
 
  • #6
dextercioby
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1 Tm^2 is equal to one 1 Weber.

Daniel.
 

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