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I How far out are the probes that were sent out

  1. Apr 27, 2017 #1
    I haven't seen any posts about it but I am curious to know how far are the probes from Earth...
    • Voyager 1
    • Voyager 2
    • Pioneer 10
    • Pioneer 11
    Do they have any chance of colliding with an object?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Apr 27, 2017 #2

    fresh_42

    Staff: Mentor

    https://voyager.jpl.nasa.gov/where/
    https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pioneer_10#/media/File:72408main_ACD97-0036-1.jpg
    https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/voyager/multimedia/pia14112.html
    https://space.stackexchange.com/que...-find-and-track-pioneer-10-11-and-voyager-1-2
    https://smd-prod.s3.amazonaws.com/science-red/s3fs-public/atoms/files/bubble_big.gif

    This depends on what you mean by an object. I assume they collide with particles quite often. Technically they are in the Kuiper belt, but to collide with the debris there, the chances are low, as it is too wide spread and far distributed. As far as I saw it on a first glimpse, the Pioneers can't be detected anymore, due to the low intensity of their signal, if not zero. So we won't know, even if they should "collide" with something.
     
  4. Apr 27, 2017 #3
    Those are some good links. Searching on Google only displays result which was posted back in 2013 or so and not helpful for current. Thanks for the links.

    I am thinking maybe an floating asteroid or a large body?
     
  5. Apr 27, 2017 #4

    fresh_42

    Staff: Mentor

    I haven't done it, but compute the volume between two balls, the inner with a diameter of 100 AU and the outer with 200 AU. (That's the volume of the area where the Voyagers currently are. The Pioneers should also be there, although "lost".) Then compare it to the volume of estimated 70,000 objects of a diameter greater than 100 km. (Estimation of objects in the Kuiper belt in a distance below 80 AU. The voyagers are further away, so there are probably even less objects. The Oort cloud ranges roughly until 100,000 AU.) Do it very conservatively and take 10,000,000 objects of say a diameter of 1,000 km. The ratio of these volumes gives you an upper bound on the density of masses in the Kuiper belt (or beyond, depending on where you define the "end" of the Kuiper belt) and thus a rough impression of the odds to "collide".
     
  6. Apr 27, 2017 #5
    It is most likely not possible, however it would be really nice to receive video feed as it travels the unknown... a video would really stands out more than just pictures.

    I wonder though, if any of the probes sent back video feed.
     
  7. Apr 27, 2017 #6

    russ_watters

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    An extra 3 or 4 years doesn't change much for a probe launched 40 years ago.
     
  8. Apr 27, 2017 #7
    True but it's always good to get fresh data... i wished they set aside little time/page to give us updates.
     
  9. Apr 27, 2017 #8

    fresh_42

    Staff: Mentor

    The Voyager link I gave you has the actual data of both probes: per second.
    Since the energy supplies of the Pioneers are too low, there is no feedback from them and thus all position announcements are speculative. And what difference would it make, whether they are 120 AU or 250 AU away from us?
     
  10. Apr 27, 2017 #9
    When I say data, i mean it as news source not just numbers but I presume you are correct.... and I am sure 120 AU and 250 AU, a lot of things can happen but what do I know.
     
  11. Apr 27, 2017 #10

    fresh_42

    Staff: Mentor

    The point is: without a signal we can't know.
    And why is

    V1: 20,604,325,047 KM (counting)
    V2: 17,047,670,769 KM (counting)
    https://voyager.jpl.nasa.gov/where/

    not accurate enough for you?
     
  12. Apr 27, 2017 #11
    While the Voyagers are still returning data, their transmission rate is very low, though still useful.
    A video data stream would require an enormously greater bandwidth, which most of the time would not be sending anything interesting.
     
  13. Apr 27, 2017 #12
    Definitely accurate enough :)
     
  14. Apr 27, 2017 #13

    tony873004

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    Last edited: Apr 27, 2017
  15. Apr 28, 2017 #14

    davenn

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    no, just individual images built up line by line similar to a fax transmission/reception
     
  16. Apr 28, 2017 #15
  17. Apr 28, 2017 #16

    fresh_42

    Staff: Mentor

    Click the check box on the left labeled "Labels"!
     
  18. Apr 28, 2017 #17

    OmCheeto

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    Gold Member
    2016 Award

    Last edited: Apr 28, 2017
  19. Apr 28, 2017 #18

    tony873004

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    Or Press "L" on your keyboard.

    I don't think you timed it right on my simulator.
    Try this.
    1. Open the simulation.
    2. Press Pause [||] on the Time Step interface or press "P" on your keyboard.
    3. Click the Autopilot Menu. Choose "Single Events" and paste the following code and press "Update":
    Code (Text):

    4/28/2016 {{pause()}}
    4/28/2017 {{pause()}}
     
    4. Unpause [>] or 'P'.
    5. The simulator will automatically pause on 4/28/2016. Record the values.
    6. Unpause [>] or 'P'.
    7. The simulator will automatically pause on 4/28/2017. Record the values. Subtract.

    The numbers I get doing this are closer to the ones in your OmCheeto column than in your tony873004 column.
     
    Last edited: Apr 28, 2017
  20. Apr 28, 2017 #19

    OmCheeto

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    Nope. Timing was near perfect. I shifted my data entry rows for some reason.

    As I said, I should be in jail.

    Previous post edited.
     
  21. May 2, 2017 #20
    So New Horizon will go further than Pioneer 10/11 in the same time length? Is it because of the faster launch time?
     
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