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How is power transmitted in an exoskeleton arm?

  1. Jul 26, 2017 #1
    In an exoskeleton arm that is designed with the purpose of enabling the user to lift more weight than they can unassisted through multiplying the force / power applied by that user, where exactly does the power that is generated by the motor get transmitted to and how does it get transmitted? What is the final component that the power gets transmitted to and how does it get transmitted?

    Does the motor convert rotary motion into linear motion to allow the user to lift objects linearly (upwards from the ground)? If so, how?

    What does the final component that receives the power do in order to allow the user to lift such heavy objects?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jul 26, 2017 #2

    Mech_Engineer

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    Can you provide an example with pictures of the exoskeleton you're describing?
     
  4. Jul 26, 2017 #3
    It's not any particular exoskeleton but in general. Especially ones that are operated by an electric motor where it's located in the arm. Just like how there are general rules in how power is transmitted from the engine to the wheels in cars.
     
  5. Jul 26, 2017 #4

    Mech_Engineer

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    There are many ways to solve the problem, I'm not sure there's a great way to answer your question. Maybe start with searching Google for "exoskeleton motor" and see what comes up?

    Here's one example for a knee exoskeleton:
    Actuator-with-Labels.jpg
     
  6. Jul 28, 2017 #5


    With all due respect, it seems like you're assuming that I haven't already performed a google search. I already have and the only reason why I even asked this question here was because I couldn't find the answer to the question I was looking for anywhere else. Also, the fact that you failed to post anything from any other website that answers my question further reinforces my point. What you posted isn't what my question was about. My question wasn't about a knee exoskeleton (a person doesn't use their knees to lift weight). My question was about the arm in which the exoskeleton is specifically made for lifting heavier weight than what a human can lift in normal conditions whilst unassisted. How is the force / power produced by the motor get transmitted to the final component before the person is able to lift an object from the ground or simply move heavy objects? What does the final component do in order to allow the user to lift such objects?

    I'm sure there are some universal rules / facts that apply to all exoskeletons just like how they apply in cars. Some things differ from car to car. However, there are certain things about power transmission that are universal. For example, the final component in which the power gets transmitted to in a car from the engine are the wheels via the drive shaft and final drive unit. It's the same thing here. I'm trying to learn common facts about power transmission in all exoskeletons in general.
     
  7. Jul 28, 2017 #6

    Mech_Engineer

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    Can you provide an example of an "exoskeleton" which currently exists and is capable of this?
     
  8. Jul 28, 2017 #7
    If they don't exist, then you could just write that.
     
  9. Jul 29, 2017 #8
  10. Jul 31, 2017 #9

    Mech_Engineer

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    It looks to me like the SARCOS using is a combination of linear drive pivots and belt/cable pull drives. You can see evidence of these in the knee, hip, shoulder, elbow, and forearm rotation joints. It's kind of an interesting exercise trying to figure out what drives each joint in the unit.

    Couple of pictures:
    XOS-2_DSC1798_Neutral-S.jpg
    a8a99ca5f64927d36c6ed4f7b7c8ef1e.jpg
    rtn08_exo_06.jpg
     
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