How is Torque Shared in Equilibrium?

  • Thread starter Curious3
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In summary, the concept of torque in combination is not commonly found in textbooks or online. However, it is important to note that for an object to be in static equilibrium, both the forces and the torques must sum to 0. This can become complicated in systems where there are too many unknown forces, known as "statically indeterminate" systems. To solve these, the material properties of the beam must be included and the amount of stress and strain must be calculated.
  • #1
Curious3
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Hey there, I'm trying to figure out how torque operates in combination and I can't find anything relating to this in any textbooks or online.

So if you a mass held by two strings in equilibrium, the force of gravity is split evenly between them right?
What happens if you have torque instead of a linear force?

A common example I have seen when looking around is that if you have three masses at known distances on a see-saw in equilibrium and you know two of the masses you can solve for the third.
But now what happens if you have a system in equilibrium where you apply a torque on one side of the see saw which is opposed by two forces at different distances on the other?

I came up with a concrete example in the figure below so it is more clear.

Are the forces equal or are the torques equal? Or perhaps neither?

proxy.php?image=http%3A%2F%2Fi.imgur.com%2FvLvKC60.png
 
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  • #2
For an object to be in static equilibrium both the forces and the torques must sum to 0.
 
  • #3
DaleSpam said:
For an object to be in static equilibrium both the forces and the torques must sum to 0.

Right this is what I've been using to try to figure it out but I get stuck with something like x+y=T where x and y are unknown.
 
  • #4
Yes, it is possible to have a system where you have too many unknown forces to solve. Such a system is known as "statically indeterminate".

In order to solve such a system you have to include the material properties of the beam and calculate the amount of stress and strain. This adds additional equations and gives you a system you can solve.
 
  • #5
DaleSpam said:
Yes, it is possible to have a system where you have too many unknown forces to solve. Such a system is known as "statically indeterminate".

In order to solve such a system you have to include the material properties of the beam and calculate the amount of stress and strain. This adds additional equations and gives you a system you can solve.

Awesome, thank you so much!
 

Related to How is Torque Shared in Equilibrium?

1. What is torque?

Torque is a measure of the twisting force applied to an object. It is calculated by multiplying the force applied by the perpendicular distance from the point of rotation to the line of action of the force.

2. How is torque shared in equilibrium?

In equilibrium, the sum of all torques acting on an object must be equal to zero. This means that the clockwise and counterclockwise torques must cancel each other out, resulting in a state of balance. Therefore, torque is shared in equilibrium by balancing out the forces acting on the object.

3. What is the difference between clockwise and counterclockwise torque?

Clockwise torque is a twisting force that causes an object to rotate in a clockwise direction, while counterclockwise torque causes an object to rotate in a counterclockwise direction. These two types of torque are equal in magnitude but have opposite directions.

4. How is torque affected by the distance from the point of rotation?

The greater the distance between the point of rotation and the line of action of the force, the greater the torque will be. This is because the longer the lever arm, the more force is applied at a perpendicular distance, resulting in a greater torque.

5. What is the equation for calculating torque?

The equation for torque is:Torque = Force x DistanceThis means that the torque is directly proportional to the force applied and the distance from the point of rotation.

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