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How much current does a 36 volt golf cart battery draw?

  1. Nov 14, 2015 #1
    Hello forum.

    How much current does a 36 volt battery draw under a full load? (Scratch the word battery in this first sentence and replace it with motor). I know I could find it under manufacturers web sites, but I cannot seem to figure it out quickly.
     
    Last edited: Nov 14, 2015
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 14, 2015 #2

    phinds

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    I don't have the answer but I advise you that batteries don't "draw" current, they supply current, so I'm assuming you mean what is the maximum current can it supply.
     
    Last edited: Nov 14, 2015
  4. Nov 14, 2015 #3

    fresh_42

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    I guess that depends on the battery. You won't get the current of a 36V golf cart battery out of 54 AAAs.
     
  5. Nov 14, 2015 #4

    phinds

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    Agreed, but my nitpicker side can't help but point out that actually, yes you will, if the load is very small. You need to say that the max current out of 54AAAs isn't likely to equal the max current out of a golf cart battery. There is also the question of amp-hours which can be quite relevant to some questions but has not been clarified by the OP regarding his question.
     
  6. Nov 14, 2015 #5

    fresh_42

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    You're quite persistent on this, aren't you? :wink:
     
  7. Nov 14, 2015 #6
    How much current would the motor use when under a full load in a Golf Cart?
     
  8. Nov 14, 2015 #7

    phinds

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    Oh, yeah. Nitpicking is one of my better qualities. I don't even talk about the rest. :smile:
     
  9. Nov 14, 2015 #8
    I guess I am wording it wrong. How much current is being used by a golf cart motor when the cart is loaded with four, fat golfers and all their stuff?
     
  10. Nov 14, 2015 #9
    The current drawn by the motor is not a fixed amount that can be derived mathematically.
    It is one of many parameters that would be taken into account by the designers of the golf cart, and not all golf carts are identical designs.
    Some designs will be relatively lightweight machines not needing a very heavy duty motor, others easily capable of moving heavier loads.
    So your question is a bit like asking how much fuel does it take to drive a car between two points A and B.
    It depends on a lot of factors, but the main one is the design of the car and in particular the capacity of it's engine.
     
  11. Nov 14, 2015 #10

    anorlunda

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    They are rated by power, not current. 5.5 hp, or 4 kW is typical.
     
  12. Nov 14, 2015 #11
    I am trying to see how feasible it would be to convert a swamp cooler to run the squirrel cage fan using batteries with solar panels. I just discovered that a 36 volt 600 watt motor-scooter motor may just work.

    Golf Cart motors can be 36 volt, but are 8 to 9 horsepower. My golf cart runs for 10 or more hours on six 6 volt batteries and three 40 watt 12 volt panels. I am not sure where all this is taking me, but I know that if I keep asking questions I will get it.

    On Northern Tools website they list a Leeson 12volt motor that draws 58 amps on a full load. That would draw down my batteries far too fast.

    My go-cart has a 36 volt Leeson motor. I run it for 2 1/2hours on three 12 volt 33ah batteries at full throttle.
     
    Last edited: Nov 14, 2015
  13. Nov 14, 2015 #12

    CWatters

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    If you want to power a swamp cooler start with data on the cooler.
     
  14. Nov 14, 2015 #13
    The cooler demands a 1/2 hp motor or larger.
     
  15. Nov 15, 2015 #14

    CWatters

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    At what rpm?
     
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