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How should I calculate conductivity

  1. May 16, 2017 #1
    Hello, I would like to ask if I have this data from impedance spectroscopy: frequency, Z(im), Z(Real), how should I calculate conductivity ? Should I use R(im) or R(re)?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. May 16, 2017 #2
    I think it is: $$\frac{1}{\sqrt{R_{Im}^2+R_{Re}^2}}$$
     
  4. May 16, 2017 #3

    berkeman

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    Staff: Mentor

    Welcome to the PF. :smile:

    What is the context of your question? You may be able to calculate and use just the magnitude as @Replusz shows, but the phase information may also be important, depending on what exactly you are gathering this data for...
     
  5. May 16, 2017 #4
    Thank you for your answers :) Well, I have r(im) and r(re) and frequency values and i need to calculate elements conductivity in particular temperature. Could you tell me more about how phase can be important?
     
  6. May 16, 2017 #5

    berkeman

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    Please tell us more about this experiment. What is the purpose? What is the material? What frequency range are you testing over? What do you plan to do with the results? The more you can tell us, the easier it is to help you. :smile:
     
  7. May 16, 2017 #6
    Frequency is from 1MHz to 1 Hz, material is perovskite. Ionic conductivity has to be calculated from sigma=L/R*A(where L- distance between electrodes, A- cross section area, R- resistivity). :) Problem is that there is whole range of data of frequency and R'', R' values so i get a lot of conductivity data. And I just need one value in particular temperature. I suppose it is quite stupid (or not) to calculate average. So maybe phase can determine which value do i need?
     
  8. May 16, 2017 #7

    berkeman

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    Why do you need the conductivity measured over that wide frequency range? What is the application? Why not just measure it at the single frequency of interest?
     
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