How to Read this Output from 'Net Share' (Win Command Line)

In summary: Share names do not need to have a $ sign on them. The $ at the end of the share indicates a hidden share so if you browse the machine remotely you will not see it come up but can still access it if you know it exists. You can create shares using the $ at the end if you want them to be hidden also.
  • #1
WWGD
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Hi,
I was experimenting , after doing some reading, with 'Net Share' in my Windows 10 Command Line, on my PC, which I'm not using as a server, i.e., I'm not running ( nor do I have installed) Windows Server nor other server software.
The output was:

Share name Resource Remark

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
C$ C:\ Default share
D$ D:\ Default share
IPC$ Remote IPC
ADMIN$ C:\WINDOWS Remote Admin
SQLServer2017Media
C:\SQLServer2017Media
The command completed successfully.

My limited research tells me the $ sign means the resourcees are being shared. Now, AFAIK, C,D drivs are shared by default ( Though not too clear on what that means/implies ). But IPC, ADMIN are not shared by default. But Remote IPC, Remote Admin are not.

Just how do I read this output?
 
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  • #2
It's always a good idea to post command line output in code tags thusly (this is my output which as you can see is similar to yours):
Code:
C:\Users\pbuk>net share

Share name   Resource                        Remark

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
C$           C:\                             Default share
E$           E:\                             Default share
IPC$                                         Remote IPC
ADMIN$       C:\WINDOWS                      Remote Admin
The command completed successfully.
WWGD said:
I'm not running ( nor do I have installed) Windows Server nor other server software.
Well you do seem to be running MS SQL Server.

WWGD said:
My limited research tells me the $ sign means the resources are being shared.
Well the fact that they are listed under "Share Name" tells you that, but yes, Windows system shares are by convention terminated with a $.

WWGD said:
Just how do I read this output?
Don't worry about it. As long as you have not messed about with your firewall settings or permissions you'll be OK.
 
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  • #3
pbuk said:
It's always a good idea to post command line output in code tags thusly (this is my output which as you can see is similar to yours):
Code:
C:\Users\pbuk>net share

Share name   Resource                        Remark

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
C$           C:\                             Default share
E$           E:\                             Default share
IPC$                                         Remote IPC
ADMIN$       C:\WINDOWS                      Remote Admin
The command completed successfully.

Well you do seem to be running MS SQL Server.Well the fact that they are listed under "Share Name" tells you that, but yes, Windows system shares are by convention terminated with a $.Don't worry about it. As long as you have not messed about with your firewall settings or permissions you'll be OK.
Thanks for the editing and the reminder. I had enabled TCP/IP for an instance. I just disabled it. Is there a way of seeing if it has been accessed remotely?
EDIT: I have an absurdly-high number of logins today: some 2500. I'm sure this is done by other processes/programs, but it seems too much in my admittedly limited understanding of this topic.
 
  • #4
WWGD said:
Thanks for the editing and the reminder. I had enabled TCP/IP for an instance. I just disabled it. Is there a way of seeing if it has been accessed remotely?
Probably not at the OS level unless you set up some specific logging. Are you running a firewall with logging? What port(s) did you open and what was listening on them? Was your router forwarding any WAN traffic to these ports?
 
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  • #5
pbuk said:
Probably not at the OS level unless you set up some specific logging. Are you running a firewall with logging? What port(s) did you open and what was listening on them? Was your router forwarding any WAN traffic to these ports?
I've only enabled apps in my 'allowed' list through the firewall. Other than that, some internal ports and none suspicious; all from sites I've logged on to. Thanks.
 
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  • #6
Thanks for your help, pbuk.
 
  • #7
pbuk said:
Well the fact that they are listed under "Share Name" tells you that, but yes, Windows system shares are by convention terminated with a $.

Share names do not need to have a $ sign on them. The $ at the end of the share indicates a hidden share so if you browse the machine remotely you will not see it come up but can still access it if you know it exists. You can create shares using the $ at the end if you want them to be hidden also.
 
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Related to How to Read this Output from 'Net Share' (Win Command Line)

1. What is the purpose of the 'Net Share' command?

The 'Net Share' command is a Windows Command Line tool that allows users to view and manage shared resources on a local or remote computer. It can be used to create, delete, and modify shared folders, as well as view information about current shares.

2. How do I use the 'Net Share' command to view shared resources?

To view shared resources using the 'Net Share' command, open the Command Prompt and type 'net share' followed by the name of the shared resource. For example, 'net share MySharedFolder' will display information about the shared folder named 'MySharedFolder'.

3. What information is included in the output from the 'Net Share' command?

The output from the 'Net Share' command includes the name of the shared resource, its location, the number of files and folders shared, the maximum number of users allowed, and any other options or remarks specified when the share was created.

4. How do I create a new shared folder using the 'Net Share' command?

To create a new shared folder using the 'Net Share' command, use the following syntax: 'net share [share name]=[folder path]'. For example, 'net share MyNewShare=C:\Users\Public\Documents' will create a new shared folder named 'MyNewShare' at the specified location.

5. Can I use the 'Net Share' command to manage shares on a remote computer?

Yes, the 'Net Share' command can be used to manage shares on a remote computer by specifying the name of the remote computer after the command. For example, 'net share MySharedFolder \\RemoteComputer' will display information about the shared folder named 'MySharedFolder' on the computer named 'RemoteComputer'.

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