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Ideas for self teaching chemistry?

  1. Feb 7, 2007 #1
    I'm currently in high school and studying physics, 2 maths ("normal" and the most advanced course, the normal is required for the advanced one by the way) as well as a few other subjects.

    I'm planning to study Electrical or Mechanical engineering or science. Maybe both. But that's irrelevant.

    I was originally planning to study chemistry, which deeply interested me, especially the material science and electronic interactions. But due to my limited choice of available subjects (time table scheduling) and my need for higher maths, I swapped chemistry for specialist mathematics (highest math course Australia (Victoria) has).

    Despite not having the course available to me any more, I'm adamant to learn more physical chemistry, hopefully being able to maybe get up to organic chemistry!

    I have a basic knowledge of acid/base interactions, precipitates, electron shells and covalent and ionic bonds. Basically, very basic knowledge.

    I still have the first part of the chemistry book (year 11, but no year 12) and have read a little bit about things like redox.

    What books would you recommend for someone who has a basic knowledge of theoretical chemistry, but wishes to teach themselves more?
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 7, 2007 #2
    It would be hard without a lab program. But I'm not too sure.
  4. Feb 10, 2007 #3
    Any suggestions for theoretical chemistry , though?
  5. Feb 13, 2007 #4
    Theoretical chemistry does not go very far before becoming physics. As matter of fact, nowhere.
  6. Feb 13, 2007 #5
    There's a theoretical chemistry? I always thought that was considered physics theory on an atomic/molecular scale.
  7. Feb 13, 2007 #6
    What I mean is, theories/basics of chemistry without the lab work (so it's just theoretical, not experimental or practical).
  8. Feb 23, 2007 #7
    Theoretical chemistry would be physics to my understanding aswell, but I am assuming that you mean you wish to self teach yourslef the theories and basic principals of chemistry, not physics.

    Well a thorough understanding of the basic principals outlined in the Year 11 book should be reached beofre taking it any further, or at least thats what i would do. Things like redox reactions/equations, stoichiometry, ionic reactions and so forth are essential. In fact, 40% of the marks on the year 12 chemistry exam are made up of stoichiometry.

    After you have an understanding of the principal's in that book i would try and get your hands on a copy of the year 12 book, and again grasp the contenet fully. (some is repeated from the year 11 course).

    Many of the basic concepts are not so hard to grasp and you should be able to get your head around it pretty well :-)
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