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I'm going to make my own sushi

  1. Feb 19, 2010 #1

    Evo

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    MIH's bento boxes made me crave sushi, so I bought some the other day, but it is so expensive. It's mainly just rice with a vey tiny amount of fish or vegetables, surely I can make it for a fraction of the cost.

    Realizing that I am not coordinated. I am think about buying the Sushezi sushi for klutzes machine.

    It has great reviews, so I figure for the price, I can't go wrong. Anyone ever use one of these?

    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B..._m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_r=1ZGKGA2P87QS955JS95K

    They look a bit large, but I can always cut them in half. Or does anyone know of a sushi shooter that makes smaller diameter rolls?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 19, 2010 #2

    Astronuc

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    As long as sharp edges are not involved. :biggrin:

    Interesting appliance. I've never used one though.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  4. Feb 19, 2010 #3
    That's how large sushi in special rolls are normally supposed to be. I'm not going to lie though i think it would be much easier and less hassle if you just do it by hand, buy a bamboo sushi mat and you are good to go.

    Make sure however that you are using the highest quality fish, I wouldn't suggest using store bought fish or even flash frozezn fish from the supermarket because these fish are not up to sushi-grade standards (unless it says so). They are meant to be consumed cooked not raw... Hopefully it turns out really well :) show some pictures!
     
  5. Feb 19, 2010 #4

    Dembadon

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    While I haven't used any sushi roll making devices, I remember how much difficulty I had with the 'traditional' method. I took an advanced foods class my senior year in high school and we were not allowed to use anything but a sharp knife and the bamboo rolling mat when making our rolls. Given how uninspiring my rolls looked, I'd probably buy it. :biggrin:
     
  6. Feb 19, 2010 #5
    The important thing is how you prepare the rice. If the rice is poorly prepared the sushi won't taste right no matter how you roll it up. I feel your pain. Sushi in America is expensive and generally of poor quality. I even had a bad sushi meal at Morimoto's. The rice was way overcooked and the meal ruined. At $80 for my wife and I, we can never go back there.
     
  7. Feb 19, 2010 #6

    minger

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    Yea, before pursuing any maki rolls, I would make sure that your fish is of the best quality. In my town theres really only two places that I would even think of buying sushi-grade fish. Do know though, the term "Sushi-grade" is not FDA nomenclature and may be subject to supplier/distributor interpretation.

    Either way, I'd start with just the fish and try some sashimi or crudo/tartar. From there, get your skill at making the rice (what sushi means). Do nigiri, which is the hand rolls.

    At that point, if you're confident in your rice and fish quality, you probably won't even need the auto-roller.

    Good luck, I've been wanting to do my own for some time.
     
  8. Feb 19, 2010 #7

    Evo

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    I live in Kansas City, KS, known for it's sushi grade fish...NOT. :frown:

    I might be using cooked shrimp and fish and maybe raw veggies, unless the asian market flies in special fish, which I kind of doubt, it doesn't get much business.
     
  9. Feb 19, 2010 #8

    minger

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    There has to be nice places in your town that do great seafood. They probably have fish flown in 2/3 times a week. Any decent sized city will have good fish places.
     
  10. Feb 19, 2010 #9

    Astronuc

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    Ya'll have catfish, no?
     
  11. Feb 19, 2010 #10

    BobG

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    Why? Did they have video cameras? You two were so full you couldn't run as fast as you thought and they caught you? Seriously, if you wait two or three months, they won't even recognize you.

    Although doing the dine and dash on a date is kind of trailer parkish anyway.
     
  12. Feb 19, 2010 #11
    Well you can always make california rolls... or there are some rolls with shrimp tempura that are REALLY delicious. If you want to get the raw fish just go to a sushi place and either ask them if they sell raw fish (normally they do) or if they can tell you a place where you can get sushi... The sushi chefs are normally really nice people and love talking about sushi and helping people out :smile:.
     
  13. Feb 19, 2010 #12

    Monique

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    Vegetarian sushi can be delicious as well. Or maybe you can do something with the restaurant-quality meats you have lying around? :wink:

    If you use raw fish you should make sure that it is of the highest grade, we don't want you catching some nasty parasite because of your new ventures :biggrin:
     
  14. Feb 19, 2010 #13
    I meant we couldn't risk paying $80 for a meal that might be just as bad as the last one. However, if someone else is paying, we could take the chance. The first time we went there the food was decent.
     
  15. Feb 19, 2010 #14

    Astronuc

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    Last edited: Feb 19, 2010
  16. Feb 19, 2010 #15
    I don't understand why so much fuss over sushi. Is it because it's Japanese? That usually puts most mundane things up a couple of notches.
    Most people like the sushi with cream cheese in it. They say they like sushi, but they really just like the cream cheese.
    My friend made his own sushi but forgot to use rice vinegar. It was so bland it hurt my mouth. And of course, he made the cream cheese sushi.
     
  17. Feb 19, 2010 #16

    turbo

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    Probably not a good idea to eat Dixie mud-fish raw. Fresh-caught or flash-frozen salmon or tuna? OK. Catfish? Not me.

    If I can manage to get some more of those monster Atlantic Salmon breeders next time the hatchery retires them, I might do some sushi with them. I had salmon sushi at the Maine Festival about 20 years ago, and the only thing keeping me from going back for more was the huge line of people. There was always a lot to do and see at the festival, so spending 1/2 hour in the blazing sun, looking at the back of another person's head just to get another plate of sushi wasn't a great option. I should have ordered two of the samplers when I got to the head of the line, but my wife didn't think she'd be into raw fish. Wrong! One taste, and I knew the sampler for one would have to be split. You got one tuna roll, one swordfish roll, and one tuna roll filled with rice and a bit of vegetable, with sides of wasabi and other interesting little tidbits.
     
    Last edited: Feb 19, 2010
  18. Feb 19, 2010 #17

    Evo

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    I love califonia rolls. I've found sushi using cooked shrimp and crab and veggie sushi is definitely something I'll do. Cucumber, hard boiled egg, radishes, I even found a preety good tasting surimi that I could use to go cheap.

    I found a wooden sushi rice bowl for $410, I think I'll pass on that.

    @ Leroyjenkins - Why do people eat sushi? It tastes good. I actually prefer American style to Japanaese style (I've been to Japan).
     
  19. Feb 19, 2010 #18

    Monique

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    You're saying sushi is mundane? That means you've never had good sushi, or it is just not for you. I love dipping the bite-sized rice rolls in soy sauce with lots of wasabi and having lots of pickled ginger to finish the meal.

    The fact that the fish needs to be uber fresh makes it special in itself, when prepared to proper standards. The fish should be caught on lines and drained of blood on the boat, not in nets such as the mass-caught fish. This makes it an exclusive and expensive product.
     
  20. Feb 19, 2010 #19

    turbo

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    This is why the Japanese restaurant in Portland ME was so popular and successful (they are the restaurant that ran the sushi concession at the Maine Festival). The Portland waterfront and commercial fish exchange are very active, so they had access to fresh cold-water sea-fish as soon as it hit the docks.
     
  21. Feb 19, 2010 #20

    Evo

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    You're killing me. It is so good!!!
     
  22. Feb 19, 2010 #21
    I've had various sushi's. The most sushi I ever eat is when I go to this Chinese restaurant for the buffet which has sushi. So you can eat as much sushi as you want. It's decent sushi, I assume.
    My friend said the same thing you did and got me to try this special sushi he got from somewhere that was pretty expensive. He said this sushi was really good and all the other sushi I've had isn't authentic and doesn't compare to this sushi. I tried it and it tasted just like the buffet sushi.
    I'd say sushi is pretty mundane, unless all the sushi I've eaten was fished out of the sewer waters and wrapped in rice also fished out of the sewers. Rice tastes like rice and raw fish just tastes bland to me. It tastes like my own tongue, but smoother.
    Does the taste drop dramatically the longer it's dead?
    If I took a bite of a fish that's still on my fishing line, would that be the best that fish could ever taste?
     
  23. Feb 19, 2010 #22

    Evo

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    It may be as Monique said, sushi may not be for you. Different people taste things differently. I like the distinct, subtle flavors and textures of sushi, I will often eat part of the sushi without any condiments first to enjoy the subtle tastes, then go for the soy, wasabi, and pickled ginger to finish it off.
     
  24. Feb 19, 2010 #23
    Yes different grades of fish and depending on how the fish is handled changes it's taste quite a bit. It's mostly a safety thing though. The most effected however would be the texture of the fish.

    People eat it because it tastes good, the fact that you are eating it from a chinese buffet tells me exactly what your friend stated: you haven't eaten good sushi :tongue:. The fact that you can't tell the difference between mediocre go to counter pick up sushi pieces and fresh sushi from a true sushi chef is kind of odd. I think you are kidding yourself... as well the rice tastes really different to me, unless of course you bathe your rice in sushi-vinegar everytime you make some rice then it should taste different to you too.
     
  25. Feb 19, 2010 #24

    Monique

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    I'm no sushi chef, but I think the sushi fish needs to be flash frozen before it can be eaten (to kill parasites). So your fishing line fish would not be quite the same.

    The fact that it is caught on a line versus in nets does make a big difference. The fish endures minimal stress and compression, which results in firm meat. Someone once demonstrated the difference on a fish market: the sushi-quality fish can be held by the tail and remain horizontal, while fish caught in nets will droop down. Also, since the fish is immediately drained of blood the flesh will taste better as well.
     
  26. Feb 19, 2010 #25

    Monique

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