Intro Physics book needed

In summary, a book that would give someone a foundation to build off would be "University Physics", "Understanding Physics", or "Apologia Science Textbooks".
  • #1
I CANNOT POST IN THE SCIENCE BOOKS AND MATERIALS SUB FORUM FOR SOME UNKNOWN REASON.

Now that that is out of the way, I am in dire need of assistance. I will be taking classical physics I and II this coming school year, and I have very poor physics background. I didn't even take high school physics.

I have gotten the book that is going to be used, and have attempted to start working through it, but its a little to complicated without having lectures, study groups and etc to get all my questions answered... So I really need a high school or pre-university physics book that will give me extensive knowledge to help me get through this course sequence.

Here is the book that my university uses:

https://www.amazon.com/dp/080532187X/?tag=pfamazon01-20

What books would give me a extensive foundation to build off, so that in the fall I'm not completely behind my class mates and completely lost.
Thanks
 
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  • #2
You can certainly post here in the Science Books forum, which is for discussion of, well, science books.

The Learning Materials forums are for posting of actual resources such as tutorials written specifically for PF, and links to resources on other Web sites. They're not for discussion.
 
  • #3
I like University Physics because it has a wide variety of sample problems to actually show how to solve problems, but I usually turn to Halliday-Resnick-Krane Physics for a more advanced and in-depth explanation of the concepts.
 
  • #4
Isaac Asimov's Understanding Physics might be helpful reading before getting into the calculus based treatment in the textbook. It should be in many school libraries and is cheap on Amazon.
 
  • #5
Indifference8 said:
<snip> I will be taking classical physics I and II this coming school year, and I have very poor physics background. I didn't even take high school physics.

<snip>

What books would give me a extensive foundation to build off, so that in the fall I'm not completely behind my class mates and completely lost.
Thanks

I'm guessing (I haven't seen this book) that this is calculus-based intro physics? I only ask because you didn't mention what your math prep is- and that's as critical as any physics prep.

In any case, from the description on amazon, it looks indistinguishable from any of the other intro physics books- same topics, same order, same basic (solved) problems, etc. So getting another intro book (I have 5 or so and they are near identical) won't likely be of much use.

So, depending on your comfort level, I would recommend either:

Feynman lectures in physics (vol I and II especially)
Spielberg and Anderson "Seven ideas that shook the Universe"
 
  • #6
I'm using Dr. Jay Wile's Apologia science textbooks right now in my high school science. He is extremely clear! Be forewarned; these start with a Christian presupposition, but I've read reviews from some people who said they're passing their college courses without studying because of these books. http://apologia.securesites.net/prodas02.php [Broken]

P.S. The books are designed for homeschoolers, and so are easy to use on your own..
 
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1. What is an introductory physics book?

An introductory physics book is a textbook that covers the fundamental concepts, principles, and theories of physics at a basic level. It is typically used for students who are new to the subject and have little or no prior knowledge of physics.

2. Why do I need an introductory physics book?

An introductory physics book is essential for building a strong foundation in physics. It provides a structured and comprehensive approach to learning the subject, which is necessary for understanding more advanced concepts in physics.

3. What topics should an introductory physics book cover?

An introductory physics book should cover a wide range of topics including mechanics, thermodynamics, electromagnetism, optics, and modern physics. It should also include real-world examples and applications to help students understand the relevance of physics in their daily lives.

4. What are the characteristics of a good introductory physics book?

A good introductory physics book should be well-organized, easy to understand, and engaging. It should include clear explanations, relevant examples, and practice problems with step-by-step solutions. It should also have visually appealing illustrations and diagrams to aid in understanding complex concepts.

5. Are there any recommended introductory physics books?

Yes, there are many highly recommended introductory physics books available. Some popular choices include "Fundamentals of Physics" by Halliday and Resnick, "University Physics" by Young and Freedman, and "Physics for Scientists and Engineers" by Giancoli. It is important to choose a book that aligns with your learning style and covers the topics you need to learn.

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