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Ionization energies

  1. Jul 11, 2005 #1
    got a homework problem...

    What is the relationship between first ionization energies and metallic and non-metallic properties?

    no idea what they are talking about here.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jul 11, 2005 #2

    Gokul43201

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    The policy here is that we can't help unless you show that you've made some effort. Where is the first place you would think to look ?
     
  4. Jul 12, 2005 #3

    Astronuc

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    Staff: Mentor

  5. Jul 12, 2005 #4

    ZapperZ

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    Er... I could be misreading something here, but if we look at the original question:

    .. the fact that "metallic and non-metallic" are involved means that this is a SOLID property, not individual atoms. If that is the case, the I'm afraid, astronuc, that the definitions of ionization energies (and electron affinities) have slightly different meanings.

    But then again, since this was asked in the Chemistry section......

    Again, the problem here is that the original question is very vague in describing the CONTEXT of the problem. This seems to be a very common occurence when people are seeking help - they seem to assume that we know what they're doing and at what level they are at. Why is that?

    Zz.
     
  6. Jul 12, 2005 #5

    Gokul43201

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    Zz, this is (from my best guess) a school level chemistry homework problem. All that is being asked for is a correlation between the first IE of an isolated atom of an element and the tendency of that element to exist as a metallic solid. And there's only one way to attempt answering this question. And while this answer can be found in the hyperphysics link provided by Astronuc, the explanation/definitions will not help any.

    No "why"s and "wherefore"s will be explained by the teacher because that would simply be beyond the scope of such a class, not to say anything about being beyond the ability of the average school teacher. A crude, hand-waving explanation, though, can be given.
     
    Last edited: Jul 12, 2005
  7. Jul 13, 2005 #6
    yes...grade 12 chemistry.

    heres what ive come up with :blushing: ...

    1. nonmetallic atoms have higher first-ionization energies than metallic atoms.

    2. certain gases have very high first ionization energies such as helium, neon, and argon. with the exception of helium, they have two s electrons and six p electrons in their outer most energy level.

    anything to add or correct?
     
  8. Jul 13, 2005 #7

    Gokul43201

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    1. Looks about right. But keep in mind that metals can exist only when you have a large number of atoms. I would call them metallic/non-metallic elements, rather than "atoms".

    2. These gases have a special name - they are called Noble Gases or Inert Gases.

    As far as the question is concerned you have answered it in #1. I'm not certain, though, if the question also wants to know why this relationship exists. You might want to ask your teacher about that.
     
    Last edited: Jul 13, 2005
  9. Jul 13, 2005 #8
    ok thanks, ill ask.
     
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