1. Limited time only! Sign up for a free 30min personal tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Is it possible to achieve absolute zero?

  1. May 9, 2015 #1
    Is it possible to achieve absolute zero?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. May 9, 2015 #2

    ShayanJ

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

  4. May 9, 2015 #3

    OCR

    User Avatar

    So it is...
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Absolute_zero
     
  5. May 9, 2015 #4
    Only if you do very poorly on your thermo exam.:biggrin:

    Chet
     
  6. May 10, 2015 #5
    But how is it possible that there is no place below -273 cantigrate degrees in the universe?
     
  7. May 10, 2015 #6

    davenn

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    Centigrade

    why do you feel the need for there to be something at absolute zero ?

    Did you read the link given in post #3 above explaining the conditions at absolute zero ?


    Dave
     
  8. May 10, 2015 #7
    There are empty areas between galaxies. I mean no any sun nearby not even 100000000000000000000 light year nearby. Aren't they even below -273,15?

    Just because a chart that shows that volume is zero at absolute zero. I can't be convinced there isn't a -273 cEntigrade degrees out there. This volume thing at 0 point is not even experimental but a chart assumption.
     
  9. May 10, 2015 #8

    davenn

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    no, incorrect

    I'll ask again ... did you read that wiki link ?

    about the coldest thing you will find out there is the cosmic microwave background which is about 3 Kelvin (ie. 3 deg above absolute zero)
    This permeates the universe everywhere between the galaxies So it pretty much predetermines the coldest temperature you will find



    Dave
     
  10. May 10, 2015 #9
    You don't need to humiliate me. That's why students don't ask questions their mentors. Anyway, yea I've read it but then it is not polynomial degradation when you leave the sun to the outer space? Because you will achieve the 0 or even below if you do so.
     
  11. May 10, 2015 #10

    jbriggs444

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor

    Probably you are thinking of exponential degradation. That pattern arises when you have a hot object that transfers heat to an infinitely large cold reservoir and the rate of heat loss is proportional to the temperature difference. The hot object cools down and its temperature asymptotically approaches the temperature of the cold reservoir.

    Given the cosmic microwave background at 3 degrees kelvin, the temperature that is approached is 3 degrees kelvin, not absolute zero.
     
  12. May 10, 2015 #11

    Vanadium 50

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Education Advisor

    If you were asking questions, I'd have a little more sympathy. But you're not - you are making statements like "This volume thing at 0 point is not even experimental but a chart assumption." If you don't like being told your statements are wrong, maybe you should stop making wrong statements.
     
  13. May 10, 2015 #12
    Our lecturer said it is because of the V-T chart. But maybe he didn't want to mention more. I am sorry for my behaviour didn't mean to make statements but tried to understand.
     
  14. May 10, 2015 #13

    OCR

    User Avatar

  15. May 10, 2015 #14
    ha ha , very funny answer.
    But seriously, didn't absolute zero come from a theoretical vanishing 'volume' of gas or object?
    How can anyone justify zero volume of anything? This tells us the theory breaks down before temperature reaches absolute zero.
    Another way of saying, temperature below absolute zero is possible in an unknown state of matter.
     
  16. May 10, 2015 #15

    PeterDonis

    User Avatar
    2016 Award

    Staff: Mentor

    No. Absolute zero has to do with temperature, not volume. It's perfectly possible to describe mathematically a system at absolute zero with finite volume.
     
  17. May 10, 2015 #16

    PeterDonis

    User Avatar
    2016 Award

    Staff: Mentor

    What chart are you talking about? Do you have a reference?
     
  18. May 10, 2015 #17

    PeterDonis

    User Avatar
    2016 Award

    Staff: Mentor

    Because there has to be a state of minimum possible energy. Absolute zero is that state.
     
  19. May 10, 2015 #18

    Vanadium 50

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Education Advisor

    I think they are arguing that all we know about absolute zero came out of Charles' Law, as if no progress was made in the intervening two centuries.
     
  20. May 10, 2015 #19

    Drakkith

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    Zero kelvin, or -273.15 centigrade, is the temperature at which the atoms/molecules that compose an object would be solely in their ground states. The ground state is the minimum energy level for that atom/molecule, so at absolute zero an object would have the least internal energy possible. There is literally no other internal energy for it to give up.
     
  21. May 10, 2015 #20

    ShayanJ

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    I think that's not the proper way of saying it. Its better to say, at absolute zero, by definition, particles will have zero energy. But because any system has a ground state energy which is greater than zero, no system can reach absolute zero.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook




Similar Discussions: Is it possible to achieve absolute zero?
  1. Absolute Zero (Replies: 18)

  2. Absolute Zero (Replies: 13)

  3. Absolute Zero (Replies: 11)

  4. Absolute Zero (Replies: 3)

Loading...