Is the Coriolis Effect Real? Exploring Motion in a Tossed Ball Video

In summary, the rotating frame explains the curved path of the ball, while the inertial frame shows it moving in a straight line.
  • #1
Aeronautic Freek
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Does ball (in video)when flying ,going in straight line or in curve line,so if I am inside this ball, will I feel like I am in car which accelarate in straight line or car which accelare in curve?
I think ball is going straight,curved path is just illusion..

 
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  • #2
In the ground frame the ball is traveling in a straight line. In the rotating frame it's traveling in a curve.

It is moving inertially, yes. It feels no acceleration once the guy has let go of it.
 
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  • #3
Ibix said:
It is moving inertially, yes. It feels no acceleration once the guy has let go of it.
So winds going in straight line so cirular motion is just illusion looking from rotating frame?
29210.jpg
 
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  • #4
The weather is a more complex case than the ball. The air is interacting with itself and the Earth, not just flying through empty (or nearly empty) space. Thus there are a great many interaction forces in play and the air is not moving inertially.

This is just like your three (four?) threads on centrifugal force. The ball problem can be analysed in an inertial frame or in a rotating frame. If you do it in a rotating frame you need Coriolos force to explain the curved path of the ball. If you do it in an inertial frame the ball is moving in a straight line. Either way it's moving inertially.

Likewise with the weather, you can still analyse it either in an inertial frame where the Earth turns, or in a rotating frame where the Earth is stationary. Only in the latter case (which is the convenient approach for us, as we're sitting on the planet and rotating with it) will Coriolis force appear in the explanation.
 
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  • #5
Aeronautic Freek said:
So winds going in straight line so cirular motion is just illusion looking from rotating frame?
When a hurricane rotates, that rotation is very real and occurs in both the inertial and rotating frames. One can think of it from the rotating frame as being due to the Coriolis force.

Let us consider a hurricane in the northern hemisphere.

From the rotating frame:

We have this stationary mass of air. In the center, air is forced upward due to its high temperature and high humidity and the adiabatic lapse rate and all that. The result is like a giant vacuum cleaner sucking air out of the middle. As the air moves toward the middle it is deflected rightward by the Coriolis force. The result is a counter-clockwise torque and a counter-clockwise circulation.

From the inertial frame:

We have this mass of air rotating counter-clockwise along with the surface of the earth. In the center, air is forced upward due to its high temperature and high humidity and the adiabatic lapse rate and all that. The result is like a giant vacuum cleaner sucking air out of the middle. Angular momentum is conserved. The air moving upward in the center carries very little angular momentum away. Air entering from the outskirts adds more. The mass of air in the middle must gain rotation rate as a result. So there is a counter-clockwise circulation. [Or think of it as a twirling skater pulling in her arms]
 
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  • #6
jbriggs444 said:
When a hurricane rotates, that rotation is very real and occurs in both the inertial and rotating frames. One can think of it from the rotating frame as being due to the Coriolis force.

Let us consider a hurricane in the northern hemisphere.

From the rotating frame:

We have this stationary mass of air. In the center, air is forced upward due to its high temperature and high humidity and the adiabatic lapse rate and all that. The result is like a giant vacuum cleaner sucking air out of the middle. As the air moves toward the middle it is deflected rightward by the Coriolis force. The result is a counter-clockwise torque and a counter-clockwise circulation.

From the inertial frame:

We have this mass of air rotating counter-clockwise along with the surface of the earth. In the center, air is forced upward due to its high temperature and high humidity and the adiabatic lapse rate and all that. The result is like a giant vacuum cleaner sucking air out of the middle. Angular momentum is conserved. The air moving upward in the center carries very little angular momentum away. Air entering from the outskirts adds more. The mass of air in the middle must gain rotation rate as a result. So there is a counter-clockwise circulation. [Or think of it as a twirling skater pulling in her arms]
Ok thanks..
I just want to know if it really rotates or not,because of so much relativitiy from which point you look something and ficitive forces ,I don't know if I am really alive or just appers to me...🙃
 
  • #7
Aeronautic Freek said:
I just want to know if it really rotates or not,because of so much relativitiy from which point you look something and ficitive forces ,I don't know if I am really alive or just appers to me...🙃
Different descriptions of the same thing. It "really" doesn't matter which you consider to be real. You are free to pick the description that is most convenient and use it.
 
  • #9
Aeronautic Freek said:
I don't know if I am really alive

That's slightly alarming :wink:
 
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  • #11
etotheipi said:
That's slightly alarming :wink:
Look,maybe from inertial frame I am not alive or just apper that I am on earth!
 

Related to Is the Coriolis Effect Real? Exploring Motion in a Tossed Ball Video

1. Is the Coriolis Effect a real phenomenon?

Yes, the Coriolis Effect is a real phenomenon that occurs due to the rotation of the Earth. It affects the motion of objects, such as a tossed ball, as they travel over long distances.

2. How does the Coriolis Effect impact the trajectory of a tossed ball?

The Coriolis Effect causes objects to appear to curve to the right in the Northern Hemisphere and to the left in the Southern Hemisphere. This means that a tossed ball will also appear to curve to the right or left, depending on which hemisphere it is in.

3. Can the Coriolis Effect be seen in other natural phenomena besides a tossed ball?

Yes, the Coriolis Effect can be seen in other natural phenomena such as ocean currents, wind patterns, and hurricanes. It also plays a role in the rotation of large storms and the direction of water draining in sinks and toilets.

4. Does the Coriolis Effect only occur on Earth?

No, the Coriolis Effect can occur on any rotating object, not just the Earth. It can also be observed on other planets, such as Mars, and even on man-made objects like satellites and rockets.

5. How does the Coriolis Effect impact global weather patterns?

The Coriolis Effect plays a significant role in global weather patterns by influencing the direction and strength of winds and ocean currents. This, in turn, affects the distribution of heat and moisture around the world, leading to different climates and weather patterns.

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