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Is your velocity constant in space-time?

  1. Dec 18, 2009 #1
    I was just wondering are you always going at a constant velocity through space-time since, as your through space increases you time slows down and vice versa. So does this mean you are maintaining a constant velocity, and if so what is that velocity.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 18, 2009 #2
    In special relativity, in an inertial frame, yes. Your space-time velocity is always the speed of light.
     
  4. Dec 18, 2009 #3

    A.T.

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    To avoid confusion with the usual 'velocity in space', it is better tp speak about 'rate of advance in space-time'. What you describe is one possible geometrical interpretation of SR visualized here:

    http://www.adamtoons.de/physics/relativity.swf

    The rate of advance in space-(proper)time in respect to coordinate time is c, for all objects.
     
  5. Dec 18, 2009 #4
  6. Dec 20, 2009 #5
    If your velocity is c then what is the measure of your velocity through time?
     
  7. Dec 20, 2009 #6
    Hi A.T. that link is a wonderful one!..very informative
     
  8. Dec 20, 2009 #7

    A.T.

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    The ratio of the times measured by a moving clock and the observers clock, can be viewed as the moving clock's 'velocity through time', in respect to that observer.
     
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