Is your velocity constant in space-time?

In summary: This velocity is always less than c, and decreases as the velocity in space increases.In summary, in special relativity, an object's space-time velocity is always the speed of light. However, to avoid confusion with traditional velocity in space, it is better to refer to this as the rate of advance in space-time. This can be visualized using a geometrical interpretation of special relativity. The measure of an object's velocity through time can be viewed as the ratio of times measured by a moving clock and an observer's clock. This velocity is always less than the speed of light and decreases as the velocity in space increases.
  • #1
nasageek
7
0
I was just wondering are you always going at a constant velocity through space-time since, as your through space increases you time slows down and vice versa. So does this mean you are maintaining a constant velocity, and if so what is that velocity.
 
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  • #2
nasageek said:
I was just wondering are you always going at a constant velocity through space-time since, as your through space increases you time slows down and vice versa. So does this mean you are maintaining a constant velocity, and if so what is that velocity.

In special relativity, in an inertial frame, yes. Your space-time velocity is always the speed of light.
 
  • #3
nasageek said:
I was just wondering are you always going at a constant velocity through space-time since, as your through space increases you time slows down and vice versa. So does this mean you are maintaining a constant velocity, and if so what is that velocity.
To avoid confusion with the usual 'velocity in space', it is better tp speak about 'rate of advance in space-time'. What you describe is one possible geometrical interpretation of SR visualized here:

http://www.adamtoons.de/physics/relativity.swf

The rate of advance in space-(proper)time in respect to coordinate time is c, for all objects.
 
  • #5
If your velocity is c then what is the measure of your velocity through time?
 
  • #6
Hi A.T. that link is a wonderful one!..very informative
 
  • #7
nasageek said:
If your velocity is c then what is the measure of your velocity through time?
The ratio of the times measured by a moving clock and the observers clock, can be viewed as the moving clock's 'velocity through time', in respect to that observer.
 

Related to Is your velocity constant in space-time?

1. What is velocity in space-time?

Velocity in space-time is a measure of an object's speed and direction of motion in four-dimensional space, including three dimensions of space and one dimension of time.

2. How is velocity in space-time different from velocity in regular space?

In regular space, velocity is measured in three dimensions, while in space-time, it is measured in four dimensions. This means that velocity in space-time takes into account the effects of time on an object's motion.

3. Is velocity constant in space-time?

No, velocity is not always constant in space-time. It can change depending on the object's acceleration and the effects of gravity.

4. How does Einstein's theory of relativity relate to velocity in space-time?

Einstein's theory of relativity explains that the laws of physics are the same for all observers, regardless of their relative velocities. This means that velocity in space-time can be perceived differently by different observers, depending on their relative motion.

5. Can an object have different velocities in different points in space-time?

Yes, an object can have different velocities in different points in space-time. This is because space-time is not a static concept and can be affected by factors such as gravity and the object's acceleration, causing its velocity to change over time and in different locations.

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