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KE/Temperature of Particles

  1. Apr 14, 2012 #1
    Page 7

    The mark scheme says we can assume that each particle has an AVERAGE KE = 1.2*10-14.

    How can this be correct ? Both particles have different masses and hence would have different KEs ?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Apr 14, 2012 #2

    sophiecentaur

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    They mean the average ke of the particles. All Exams have at least one badly worded question in them. I think it is a government requirement.
     
  4. Apr 14, 2012 #3
    Could you elaborate ? I don't quite understand what you mean ?
     
  5. Apr 14, 2012 #4

    Khashishi

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    Both particles have different masses but the same kinetic energy because the lighter particle is moving faster.
     
  6. Apr 14, 2012 #5

    sophiecentaur

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    A particle doesn't have a temperature. It will have KE. The temperature is the average KE of all the (large number of) particles.
    The average is over all the particles rather the average of 'each' particle (over all time?).
     
  7. Apr 14, 2012 #6

    sophiecentaur

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    The whole question may tell us which way the examiner is thinking.
     
  8. Apr 14, 2012 #7
    The question begins on page 6......
     
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