Last thing to be recorded near Black Hole

In summary: Please help me out with some basic concepts ?In summary, the sensor on the bot only receives signals that fall onto it in a radial direction, and the bot will eventually go into the black hole. Any other bodies in the vicinity will have a negligible effect on the bot. The bot's sensor may be able to "ignore" what is happening around it and focus on the black hole.
  • #1
Astro.padma
80
0

Homework Statement




An alien civilization has sent a small Spherical bot, made of Sterling Silver,
fitted with a light emitter and sensor as depicted below, towards a black hole
to explore the region around it. The bot moves slowly towards the black hole,
radially into it. The light source emits light in such a way that it
is tangential (at
the pt. of emission) to a circle with ‘centre of black hole’ as its
centre, and the
distance between the black hole and the centre of the bot as its radius. The
region around the black hole is free of dust or any other obstacle, and there
are no other light sources anywhere nearby which can be perceived by the
sensor.
Due to some malfunction, the sensor of the bot receives only those signals,
which fall onto it radially.
What will be the last thing that the sensor records before it perceives the
blackness of the black hole?
NOTE : The effect of gravity of any other bodies other than the black hole on
the bot is negligible

Homework Equations





The Attempt at a Solution



As light bends around the black hole, there would be two rays coming to the sensor , thus forming double image of the surrounding stars... as it could receive signals only in radial direction, is it a single image of the surrounding stars?


Am I moving in the right direction or going wrong somewhere?
Please come up with a different solution (if any)


Umm...Sorry if am asking silly questions but try to answer them as am really a beginner :)
 
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  • #2
please clarify - the sensor and emitter are on the same bot, then the sensor receives light from the emitter directly, isn't it?
 
  • #3
supratim1 said:
please clarify - the sensor and emitter are on the same bot, then the sensor receives light from the emitter directly, isn't it?

Um...Yeah you are right ! but... I don't think it is right :frown:

Can you think it in other way?
 
  • #4
pranathi said:
Can you think it in other way?

What other way are you suggesting?
 
  • #5
supratim1 said:
What other way are you suggesting?

Um...may be, ignoring what you have told in the 1st reply and going with some cocnept ??
 
  • #6
sorry i am not getting any idea of what concept to use here.
 

What is a black hole?

A black hole is an area in space with such a strong gravitational pull that nothing, including light, can escape from it. It is formed when a massive star dies and collapses in on itself.

Why is it the last thing to be recorded near a black hole?

Due to the intense gravitational pull of a black hole, anything that gets too close to it will be pulled in and destroyed. Therefore, any recording equipment or spacecraft that gets too close will be destroyed, making it the last thing to be recorded.

What would happen if something was recorded near a black hole?

If something was recorded near a black hole, it would likely be pulled into the black hole and destroyed. Alternatively, if it was far enough away, it may be able to capture some data before being pulled in.

Is it possible to record anything inside a black hole?

No, it is not possible to record anything inside a black hole. The intense gravitational pull of a black hole would prevent any equipment or spacecraft from entering and surviving inside the black hole.

Why is it important to study the last thing to be recorded near a black hole?

Studying the last thing to be recorded near a black hole can provide valuable insights into the behavior and properties of black holes. It can also help us understand the effects of extreme gravity and the limits of physics in the presence of a black hole.

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