Latent Heat of Vaporization

In summary, to yield liquid water at 20 Celcius, a certain amount of steam at 100 Celcius must be added to 1.00 kg of ice at 0 Celcius. This can be calculated by dividing the problem into two parts: how much heat is needed to melt the ice and how much heat is needed to raise the temperature of the water from 0 C to 20 C. The heat supplied by the steam must equal the sum of these two calculations, taking into account the two types of latent heat involved.
  • #1

Homework Statement



What mass of steam at 100 Celcius must be added to 1.00 kg of ice at 0 Celcius to yield liquid water at 20 Celcius.


Homework Equations



Q = mL
Q = mc(deltaT)
change in energy = 0

The Attempt at a Solution



Ice
m= 1.00
c = 2100
T1 = 0
Tf =
L = 333

water
m=
c = 4190
T1 =
Tf= 20

Steam
m = ?
c = 2010
L = 2260
T1 = 100
Tf =

I am stil missing some of the needed information and i am not sure how to organize my equations.
 
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  • #2
Divide into two parts.

How much heat is needed to melt the ice?

How much heat is needed to raise the temp of this water from 0 C to 20 C?

This whole heat is supplied by a certain amount of steam, which first gives up the latent heat of evaporation, and then cools from 100 c to 20 C. Equate this to the sum of the first two.

(Remember, there are two kinds of latent heat involved here. Don't mix them up)
 
  • #3
Can you please provide more information on the initial and final temperatures for the water and steam, as well as the specific heat capacities for liquid water and steam? This will help me provide a more accurate solution to the problem. Additionally, please clarify if the change in energy should be zero or if there is a specific value given for it. Thank you.
 

What is the definition of Latent Heat of Vaporization?

The Latent Heat of Vaporization is the amount of energy required to transform a substance from a liquid state to a gaseous state at constant temperature and pressure. It is the heat absorbed by a substance during the phase change from liquid to gas, without a change in temperature.

What are some common examples of Latent Heat of Vaporization?

Some common examples of Latent Heat of Vaporization include boiling water, the evaporation of sweat, and the process of steam generation in power plants. It is also a key component in the water cycle, where liquid water on Earth's surface is heated by the sun and eventually evaporates into the atmosphere.

How is the Latent Heat of Vaporization calculated?

The Latent Heat of Vaporization is calculated by dividing the amount of energy required for a phase change by the mass of the substance. This value is known as the specific latent heat of vaporization and is typically measured in units of joules per kilogram (J/kg).

What factors affect the Latent Heat of Vaporization?

The Latent Heat of Vaporization is affected by several factors, including the type of substance, the surrounding temperature and pressure, and the molecular structure of the substance. Substances with stronger intermolecular forces typically have higher Latent Heats of Vaporization.

How is Latent Heat of Vaporization important in everyday life?

Latent Heat of Vaporization plays a crucial role in many everyday processes, such as cooking, cleaning, and weather patterns. It also has practical applications in industries such as power generation, refrigeration, and distillation. Understanding Latent Heat of Vaporization allows for the efficient use of energy and effective control of temperature changes in various systems.

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