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Laws of Forces and Motion

  1. Oct 9, 2007 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data

    A block of mass m=2.00kg is released from rest at h=5m above the surface of the table, at the top of a theta=30 degrees incline. The frictionless incline is fixed upon a table with a height of 2.0m. a) determine acceleration as it slides down the incline.
    b)What is velocity of block as it leaves incline?
    c) How far from the table will the block hit the floor?
    d)what time interval elapses.

    2. Relevant equations
    a) F = ma, a = F/m
    b) Vf^2 = Vi^2 + (2*a*position)
    c) ?
    d) position = Vi + 1/2*a*t^2

    3. The attempt at a solution
    I figured out part a, the acceleration, and part b, the velocity at which the object left the incline. However, as soon as the object leaves the incline, it begins falling off the table. If i'm suppose to separate this part of the question into vector components, how would I go about doing that? Can I use the acceleration I found in a) as the horizontal acceleration?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 9, 2007 #2

    Doc Al

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    Staff: Mentor

    Once the object leaves the incline and starts falling, it becomes a projectile just like any other. What must its acceleration be?
     
  4. Oct 9, 2007 #3
    Acceleration due to gravity, however, since the particle was accelerating to begin with, does that play a role in anything?
     
  5. Oct 9, 2007 #4

    Doc Al

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    Staff: Mentor

    Not once it leaves the incline and start falling. (Any force that the incline was exerting on the object stops acting as soon as the object loses contact with the incline.)
     
  6. Oct 9, 2007 #5
    Understood! Thank you!
     
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