Light, Current, & Magnetism Relationship?

In summary, light is produced by electrons moving to a lower energy state and emitting a photon of a specific wavelength in the electromagnetic spectrum. Current is the movement of electrons and can induce a magnetic field. Magnetic fields can also create current by moving charges. There is a relationship between the energy of light and the energy of magnetic or electric fields, as indicated by the name "electromagnetic spectrum." In terms of the formation of magnetic fields, Biot-Savart's law and Maxwell's equations explain how EM-fields are created from charges in motion. Additionally, the Lorentz force, which is related to conservation of energy, shows that there is a connection between force, velocity, and energy in these scenarios.
  • #1
hobbesglobin
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Light is the result of an electron moving to a lower energy state, giving off a photon a particular wavelength in the electromagnetic spectrum. Current is the movement of electrons which induces a magnetic field. A magnetic field can create current by moving charges.

Is there a relation between the energy contained in light, and the energy of magnetic or electric field (as suggested by the name "electromagnetic spectrum")?


More questions:
Does a magnetic field exist anywhere there is a potential difference between positive and negative charges? If so, how is this different from an electrical field other than magnetic poles cannot be separated (unlike charged particles)?

Why does the magnetic field around a conductor form concentric circles when in the inverse situation (a charged particle entering a magnetic field) current spirals around the magnetic field needing an initial velocity in order to interact with the field?

Correct me if I'm wrong, I'm new to this, but very curious.
 
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  • #2
"Is there a relation between the energy contained in light, and the energy of magnetic or electric field (as suggested by the name "electromagnetic spectrum")?"

The intensity of light equals [tex]\frac{c}{8\pi}\sqrt{\frac{\epsilon}{\mu}}|E_0|^2[/tex]
(in Gaussian units), where E_0 is the amplitude of the oscillating electric field.
 
Last edited:
  • #3
"Why does the magnetic field around a conductor form concentric circles when in the inverse situation (a charged particle entering a magnetic field) current spirals around the magnetic field needing an initial velocity in order to interact with the field?"

The first comes from Biot-Savarts law, which is a version of one of Maxwells equations:
rot(B)=j/mu. The latter case from the Lorentz Force: F=q*vxB. Losely speaking Maxwells equations tells how EM-fields are created from charges, at rest -or in motion. They does not tell where the charges comes from (unfortunately). Lorentz force is connected to conservation of energy: Force*velocity=change in energy /time unit (This is obtained from the contraction of the covariant em-field tensor and the four-velocity), which results in the equation for the Lorentz force.

Note also the classical relativity effect: E=vXB/c, when we are in the electrons rest-frame and the source of magnetic field is in motion with velocity v (towards the electron) -A electric field E is created when the magnetic field B moves!
 

1. What is the relationship between light, current, and magnetism?

The relationship between light, current, and magnetism is known as the electromagnetic spectrum. All three are forms of energy that are interconnected and can be converted into each other. Light is an electromagnetic wave that can generate an electric current when it interacts with a conductor, and this current then produces a magnetic field. Similarly, a changing magnetic field can produce an electric current, which in turn can create light.

2. How does light interact with a magnetic field?

When light passes through a magnetic field, it experiences a force called the Lorentz force. This force causes the path of the light to bend, a phenomenon known as the Faraday effect. The degree of bending depends on the strength of the magnetic field and the properties of the light, such as its wavelength and polarization.

3. What is the role of current in the relationship between light and magnetism?

Current is essential in the relationship between light and magnetism because it is the flow of charged particles that creates a magnetic field. When light interacts with a conductor, it can generate an electric current, which then produces a magnetic field. This magnetic field can then interact with the original light, creating a complex relationship between the two.

4. How does the speed of light affect its relationship with current and magnetism?

The speed of light is a fundamental constant that plays a crucial role in the relationship between light, current, and magnetism. The speed of light determines how quickly an electric current can be generated in a conductor when it interacts with light. It also affects the strength and direction of the magnetic field created by the current, which in turn can impact the behavior of the light.

5. How is the relationship between light, current, and magnetism applied in everyday life?

The relationship between light, current, and magnetism has numerous applications in everyday life. For example, it is used in technology such as electric motors, generators, and transformers. It also plays a role in medical imaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and in communication systems such as radio and television. Additionally, the study of this relationship has led to advancements in fields such as optics, electromagnetism, and quantum mechanics.

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