Magnetic Fields and total force

In summary, the conversation discusses finding the total force experienced by a rectangular loop in the z = 0 plane with given dimensions and current. The formula F = Int(dl x B) is suggested and the problem of finding dl is addressed. The conversation also mentions the possibility of needing additional data to solve the problem. The final conclusion is that the total resultant force is zero and it is explained that this makes sense due to the presence of opposite currents in the loop. The conversation ends with a question about the effect of reversing the current in a wire.
  • #1
Baracabacca
4
0
Help!

Given that B = (6x, -9y, 3z) find the total force experienced by a rectangular loop in the z = 0 plane:

Loop defined as...
1<x<3
1<y<2

with 5 Amp current flowing COUNTERclockwise.
 
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  • #2
Baracabacca said:
Help!

Given that B = (6x, -9y, 3z) find the total force experienced by a rectangular loop in the z = 0 plane:

Loop defined as...
1<x<3
1<y<2

with 5 Amp current flowing COUNTERclockwise.
1) according to our guidelines, you need to show us what you have done
2) what is the formula that you would use here ?
3) are you sure you have all the data that you need ?

marlon
 
  • #3
1) I guess I got a little anxious with the submit button!

I'm having problems setting up the equation.

2) I believe we're to use the equation: F = Int(dl x B) (where "x" indicated a cross product.)

I know I need to apply superposition to the loop - doing the integral for each of the four sides of the loop.

My problem comes from finding dl. Maybe I'm approaching the problem from the wrong angle. I initially thought you would use the integral relating B and the length of the loop in differential form.

3) I've submitted all information given, but I'm unclear if there's an intermediate step to solve extra needed data.
 
Last edited:
  • #4
Baracabacca said:
1) I guess I got a little anxious with the submit button!

I'm having problems setting up the equation.

2) I believe we're to use the equation: F = Int(dl x B) (where "x" indicated a cross product.)

I know I need to apply superposition to the loop - doing the integral for each of the four sides of the loop.

My problem comes from finding dl. Maybe I'm approaching the problem from the wrong angle. I initially thought you would use the integral relating B and the length of the loop in differential form.

3) I've submitted all information given, but I'm unclear if there's an intermediate step to solve extra needed data.

Sinde the field is constant, your integral reduces to a sum of four terms for the four sides of the loop, where each term is of the form (Bold is vector)

F = I L x B
 
  • #5
With that analysis I keep getting the total resultant force as zero. Does this make any sense?
 
  • #6
Baracabacca said:
With that analysis I keep getting the total resultant force as zero. Does this make any sense?

What happens to the force when you reverse the current in a wire? You have pairs of opposite currents, so it absolutely does make sense. Torque would be a different matter.
 
  • #7
That's right! Thank you so much for the help!
 

What is a magnetic field?

A magnetic field is a region in space where a magnetic force can be detected. It is created by moving electric charges, such as the flow of current in a wire, and is represented by lines of force that point from the north pole to the south pole.

How is a magnetic field created?

A magnetic field is created by moving electric charges. This can happen naturally, such as with Earth's magnetic field created by the movement of molten iron in its core, or artificially, such as with an electromagnet where an electric current is passed through a wire wrapped around a magnetic material.

What is the total force of a magnetic field?

The total force of a magnetic field is the combination of two different types of forces: magnetic force and electric force. These forces act on charged particles, such as electrons, and can cause them to move in a certain direction.

Can magnetic fields be shielded?

Yes, magnetic fields can be shielded using materials that are highly permeable to magnetic fields, such as iron or steel. These materials can redirect the magnetic field lines and reduce its strength in a certain area.

How are magnetic fields measured?

Magnetic fields can be measured using a device called a magnetometer, which can detect the strength and direction of a magnetic field. The unit of measurement for magnetic fields is the Tesla (T) or Gauss (G), with 1T = 10,000G.

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