Magnetic Permeability: Temperature Effects

In summary, The Meissner effect allows a magnet to float, but the large reluctance of the magnetic field makes this difficult. Additionally, the maximum reluctance is limited by the permeability of free space, unless the relative permeability is artificially reduced to less than 1. The Meissner effect is caused by current loops and opposing magnetic fields in the semiconductor. It is not far from the situation described. It is possible to use this effect to generate electricity, but the advantages and original energy source are unknown. The opposing field in the semiconductor may be equal to the external flux, but it is not strong enough to be detected by a coil. Its H value may be present, but its B value is equal to 0.
  • #1
Narayanan KR
76
4
TL;DR Summary
Is the superconductor in meissner effect able to completely repel external magnetic fields because it provides large magnetic reluctance(small permeability) thereby forcing the external flux to chose alternate paths of low reluctance as shown in case 1 electrical equivalent or is it because an equal and opposite field gets produced by current loops inside the superconductor(T<Tc) as shown by case 2 circuit
If it is case 2 then can this reaction field be harnessed by a coil for electricity ?
meissner1.jpg

One more thing i forgot to add, is magnetic permeability of a metal constant irrespective of its temperature including superconducting temperature ?
 
Engineering news on Phys.org
  • #2
The Meissner effect can make the magnet float, but the large reluctance seems unable to do this.

In addition, under the same size ratio, the maximum reluctance will be limited by the permeability of free space, unless we artificially reduce the relative permeability to less than 1.
 
  • Like
Likes Narayanan KR
  • #3
alan123hk said:
The Meissner effect can make the magnet float, but the large reluctance seems unable to do this.

In addition, under the same size ratio, the maximum reluctance will be limited by the permeability of free space, unless we artificially reduce the relative permeability to less than 1.
so the meissner effect is due to current loops followed by opposing magnetic fields created in the semiconductor ?
 
  • #4
Narayanan KR said:
so the meissner effect is due to current loops followed by opposing magnetic fields created in the semiconductor ?
It seems that the situation is not far from what you said.

Narayanan KR said:
Can the coil use this reaction field to generate electricity?

In fact, I don't know much about how the Meissner effect works.
But if you want to use it to generate electricity, what do you think of its advantages and where the original energy comes from ?
 
  • Like
Likes Narayanan KR
  • #5
alan123hk said:
It seems that the situation is not far from what you said.
In fact, I don't know much about how the Meissner effect works.
But if you want to use it to generate electricity, what do you think of its advantages and where the original energy comes from ?
i guess the opposing field in the semiconductor is equal to external flux but never large enough to allow itself to be detected by a coil, it may have H but B=0
 

1. What is magnetic permeability?

Magnetic permeability is a measure of how easily a material can be magnetized. It is a physical property that describes the ability of a material to allow magnetic fields to pass through it.

2. How does temperature affect magnetic permeability?

Temperature can affect magnetic permeability in different ways, depending on the material. In some materials, such as ferromagnetic materials, an increase in temperature can cause a decrease in magnetic permeability. In other materials, such as paramagnetic materials, an increase in temperature can cause an increase in magnetic permeability.

3. Why does temperature affect magnetic permeability?

The atomic structure of a material is responsible for its magnetic properties. Temperature can cause changes in this structure, which can in turn affect the material's magnetic permeability. For example, in ferromagnetic materials, an increase in temperature can cause the atoms to vibrate more, disrupting the alignment of their magnetic moments and decreasing the material's overall magnetic permeability.

4. What is the relationship between magnetic permeability and temperature?

The relationship between magnetic permeability and temperature is not always straightforward. In some materials, there may be a direct relationship where an increase in temperature leads to a decrease in magnetic permeability. In other materials, the relationship may be more complex, with temperature affecting different aspects of the material's atomic structure and magnetic properties.

5. How is the temperature dependence of magnetic permeability measured?

The temperature dependence of magnetic permeability can be measured using various techniques, such as vibrating sample magnetometry or SQUID magnetometry. These methods involve subjecting a sample of the material to different temperatures and measuring its magnetic properties at each temperature to determine how magnetic permeability changes with temperature.

Similar threads

Replies
2
Views
1K
  • Electrical Engineering
Replies
9
Views
1K
  • Electrical Engineering
Replies
10
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
12
Views
1K
  • Atomic and Condensed Matter
Replies
6
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
1
Views
711
  • Electrical Engineering
Replies
4
Views
6K
  • Electromagnetism
Replies
2
Views
3K
  • Atomic and Condensed Matter
Replies
3
Views
1K
Replies
8
Views
757
Back
Top