Magnitude of horizontal forces

In summary, the child pulling the wagon with a horizontal handle results in different tension forces at each end of the handle due to the formula T1 - T2 = ma. The tension forces are 25.3 N and 29.4 N for T1 and T2, respectively. The child's mass is 30 kg and the wagon's mass is 11 kg. The other horizontal forces acting on the child are not mentioned, but they could potentially include the child's own force or any external forces such as gravity or friction. It is not specified how the child is managing to accelerate himself and the wagon, but it is likely that he is simply pulling the wagon using his own strength.
  • #1
CaitlinCrow
2
0
A child pulls an 11 kg wagon with a horizontal handle whose mass is 1.8 kg. This results in the wagon and the handle accelerating at 2.3 m/s^2. Find the tension forces at each end of the handle. Why are these different?

Suppose that the mass of the child is 30 kg. What is the magnitude of the other horizontal forces acting on the child, besides the tension in the handle? Assume the child moves along with the wagon.

F = ma
T1 - T2 = ma

Answer to first question: The tension forces are not equal because the formula states that T1 - T2 = m(a) and neither mass or acceleration are equal to 0.

Answer to second:
T1 = 11 kg (2.3 m/s^2) = 25.3 N
T2 = (11 kg + 1.8 kg)(2.3 m/s^2) = 29.4 N

This is where I'm stuck. What is the magnitude? What is the equation I'm supposed to be using. Do I just subtract the two tensions? Also do I subtract the mass of the wagon from the mass of the child?

 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
How is the child managing to accelerate self and wagon?
 
  • #3
haruspex said:
How is the child managing to accelerate self and wagon?
That's all of the question. The child is pulling the wagon himself.
 
  • #4
CaitlinCrow said:
That's all of the question. The child is pulling the wagon himself.
Yes, but how is the child managing to go forwards, do you think? Pulled by a team of trained rabbits, perhaps? Attracted by a black hole? What's most likely?
 

Related to Magnitude of horizontal forces

What is the magnitude of horizontal forces?

The magnitude of horizontal forces refers to the strength or size of the forces acting in a horizontal direction. It is typically measured in units of newtons (N) or pounds (lbs).

How is the magnitude of horizontal forces calculated?

The magnitude of horizontal forces is calculated by taking into account the size and direction of each individual force acting in a horizontal direction. The total magnitude can be found by adding or subtracting the individual forces depending on their direction.

What factors affect the magnitude of horizontal forces?

The magnitude of horizontal forces can be affected by a number of factors such as the weight of an object, the surface it is on, friction, and the angle at which the force is being applied. Other factors, such as air resistance and external forces, can also impact the magnitude.

Why is the magnitude of horizontal forces important?

The magnitude of horizontal forces is important because it helps determine the overall motion and stability of an object. If the magnitude is too great, it can cause an object to accelerate or even break. Understanding the magnitude of forces can also help in designing structures and predicting their behavior.

How can the magnitude of horizontal forces be measured?

The magnitude of horizontal forces can be measured using a variety of instruments such as force sensors, strain gauges, and dynamometers. These instruments can provide accurate measurements of the forces acting on an object in a horizontal direction.

Similar threads

  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
7
Views
521
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
13
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
7
Views
462
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
13
Views
577
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
3
Views
4K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
5
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
8
Views
2K
Replies
18
Views
1K
Replies
6
Views
890
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
9
Views
1K
Back
Top