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Math Question

  1. Apr 10, 2007 #1
    Ok. K this equation I am suppose to make has to variables
    The magnitude is increasing at a certain rate. It is a pattern. I need to find an equation for this pattern

    Say we have:

    r^0
    r^1
    r^3
    r^6
    r^10

    Ok. As you can see, the added magnitude is increasing by 1 everytime. I need to create this equation where the magnitude is a variable. So it could be like r^n+1 or something like that. Lol. Plz help asap.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Apr 10, 2007 #2

    symbolipoint

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    The exponents fit the form, [tex]\sum _1 \^{n} \(n-1) [/tex]

    [in case the typesetting did not work, I said, summation from 1 to n, of (n-1)]
     
  4. Apr 10, 2007 #3

    symbolipoint

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    .....in fact, the typesetting did NOT work; I will try studying other messages for anything doing what I tried.

    Let me try again now:

    [tex] \sum_1^n \((n-1) [/tex] If that does not work, then check my description in previous message.
     
    Last edited: Apr 10, 2007
  5. Apr 11, 2007 #4

    symbolipoint

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    This also might not work well because I'm still trying to learn the typesetting, but any k term would be :

    [tex]{r}^{\frac{k(k-1)}{2}[/tex]
    ... or in simple text form,
    r^(k(k-1)/2)

    Check an intermediate algebra book for how the expression formula was developed.
     
  6. Apr 11, 2007 #5

    HallsofIvy

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    The "tutorial" section is for just that- tutorials showing people how to do things. Questions should be posted in the "Homework" section. I am moving this thread to that section.

    Your exponents are "triangular" numbers: n(n+1)/2. The form you want is just what symbolipoint said in his last post.
     
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