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Maximum compression of spring.

  1. Oct 12, 2008 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data

    I know the mass of the block and it's velocity when it contacts the spring and the spring conststant. It is on a horizontal frictionless surface.

    2. Relevant equations



    3. The attempt at a solution
    I know there is an equation to find the but I just cannot find it in my notes or remember what it is. Can anyone help me out with this one?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 12, 2008 #2

    Doc Al

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    Staff: Mentor

    What's conserved?
     
  4. Oct 12, 2008 #3

    dlgoff

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    Gold Member

    The distance if proportional to the force applied.
     
  5. Oct 12, 2008 #4
    Momentum is conserved since there is no friction, the blocks would fly off at the same speed.
     
  6. Oct 12, 2008 #5

    Doc Al

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    There's only one block and a spring. (At least, that's what I presume. If not, please state the full problem.) Momentum is not conserved, but something else is.
     
  7. Oct 12, 2008 #6
    There were two but they are now "perfecly inelastically together. (is there is such a term) and I know the velocity of that new mass. Kinetic Energy is conserved?
     
  8. Oct 13, 2008 #7

    Doc Al

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    Please get in the habit of describing the complete problem, otherwise we are forced to guess what the issue is. So, I'm guessing, the problem is two masses colliding with a spring between them? (Which is quite different from a mass colliding with a fixed spring.) In that case both momentum and mechanical energy are conserved. (Not just kinetic energy, but spring potential energy as well.)
     
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