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Motion Near the Earth's Surface

  1. Dec 14, 2004 #1
    What is the acceleration of the system illustrated, if the coefficient of kinetic friction is 0.2? Assume that it starts.

    The picture is a triangle with an angle of 30degrees to the horizontal. A box of 3Kg is on the slope(hypotenuse) and attached with a string, going along the slope. It is basicaly a pulley system and there is a 3kg mass hanging on the right.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 14, 2004 #2
    This is a basic Newton's Second Law problem. If you can, why don't you scan a picture in, or draw one, and tell us what you are doing :D
     
  4. Dec 14, 2004 #3
    How shall I show you?
     
  5. Dec 14, 2004 #4

    dextercioby

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    By loading it as an attachement to one of your messages ??? :confused: :wink:
     
  6. Dec 14, 2004 #5
    ya but
    its too big.....it says I can only allow 400X400 and have less than 50Kb
     
  7. Dec 14, 2004 #6

    dextercioby

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    Yes,i've encountered the same problem with the dimention of the files i was going to upload.And that's because they remain on the server.
    Maybe another format (.gif,compressed bitmap,.jpeg) with less dimension.
     
  8. Dec 14, 2004 #7
    Compression compression compression :P or just post it elsewhere and post it as a link
     
  9. Dec 14, 2004 #8
    its stupid because I don't know how to resize it to another resolution....
     
  10. Dec 14, 2004 #9
    Photoshop will do it.
     
  11. Dec 14, 2004 #10
    There It's finaly done all that work
     

    Attached Files:

  12. Dec 14, 2004 #11
    that one is better quality
     

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