New High Efficiency Power Lines

  • #1
10,781
3,648
I read an interesting article on progress in making transmission lines more efficient:
https://reneweconomy.com.au/super-c...-capacity-and-open-floodgates-for-renewables/

While, of course, we do not discuss politics here, this new technology has many advantages. When I read about it, I thought, why isn't everybody doing it? It looks like a no-brainer.

The question is, am I missing something, or is this something that is happening without fanfare?

Thanks
Bill
 
Engineering news on Phys.org
  • #2
Tell him he is dreaming.
Superconducting wires are not yet realistic.

We need more than a 30% increase, we need a factor of two or three at least.

The article assumes 3PH AC transmission. That leads to stabilisation and regulation problems between states, which is acknowledged.

When HV DC transmission lines are implemented, those problems will be gone. The conversion stations at the ends of the HV DC lines handle the phase and voltage differences.
 
  • Like
  • Love
Likes Rive, sophiecentaur, DaveE and 1 other person
  • #3
Baluncore said:
When HV DC transmission lines are implemented, those problems will be gone.
High voltage DC links in Europe have ben used successfully for a long time. We're all hanging on for the arrival of suitable superconductors.

On the topic of electrical power distribution, there was an episode of 'In Our Time', which is a weekly BBC R4 programme. It discusses the life and times of Nicola Tesla and the Battle between AC and DC, a century ago. All the same factors were at work back then - only the nujmbers were different. It's well worth a listen and puts Tesla in his deserved place - an inspired inventor who was deified by too many people.
 
  • Like
Likes bhobba and Rive
  • #4
bhobba said:
The question is, am I missing something
It's about a missing link between the article and reality.

Baluncore said:
The article assumes 3PH AC transmission. That leads to stabilisation and regulation problems between states, which is acknowledged.
...and at this point please allow me to recite again the tale about the Great Central European Loop Flow and the Heroic Band of DC-links and PSTs around Germany what finally slain that Great Evil o0)
 
  • Like
Likes sophiecentaur and bhobba
  • #5
Rive said:
It's about a missing link between the article and reality.

Increasing capacity, when air temperature is lower than normal, is only advantageous during peak demand. The peak demand on Australia's transmission lines is in the afternoon, during heatwaves, when temperatures and air conditioning loads are already at a maximum. Maybe that will change sometime, with more local solar panels powering the local AC.

If you look along a transmission line during a strong wind, you will see the side force due to aerodynamic wind drag are greater than the conductor weight due to gravity. For that reason, increasing the diameter of the cable for the same weight, would significantly increase the wind forces on the insulators and towers, which is the vector sum of wind and gravity.

By changing from a solid conductor, to a bundle of four wires, as an open cage, wind drag could be maintained, and the current increased with better cooling.
Taking advantage of the cage, by increasing the voltage on the line, is precluded by the length of the insulators, and the tower dimensions.

Wherever possible, HVDC links are installed underwater, where the cooling is predictable, and not determined by heatwaves and winds. In Australia, I would expect future HVDC lines, to cross straits, or run offshore, parallel with the coast, between wind generation fields and major cities on the coast.

At the same time, the HVDC cable would provide a coastal bus that links the Southern and East coast states. From Port Lincoln in South Australia, Victoria & Tasmania, New South Wales, to Townsville in Queensland.
 
  • Like
Likes bhobba and Rive

Similar threads

  • Electrical Engineering
Replies
2
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
2
Views
813
  • Electrical Engineering
2
Replies
53
Views
2K
  • Electrical Engineering
Replies
7
Views
2K
  • Electrical Engineering
Replies
4
Views
1K
Replies
39
Views
7K
Replies
11
Views
2K
  • Electrical Engineering
Replies
3
Views
1K
  • Electrical Engineering
Replies
5
Views
1K
  • Electrical Engineering
4
Replies
108
Views
10K
Back
Top